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Open AccessArticle

Nutrient and Chemical Contaminant Levels in Five Marine Fish Species from Angola—The EAF-Nansen Programme

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Seafood, Nutrition and Environmental State, Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 2029, Nordnes, 5817 Bergen, Norway
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Quality Control Department of Fisheries Products, National Institute of Fisheries and Marine Research, P.O. Box 2901, Luanda, Angola
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Fisheries and Aquaculture Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 00153 Rome, Italy
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Department of Food Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, P.M.B. 1526, Owerri 460114, Nigeria
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Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7803, 5020 Bergen, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(5), 629; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050629
Received: 2 April 2020 / Revised: 4 May 2020 / Accepted: 9 May 2020 / Published: 14 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seafood and Seafood Products)
Fish is a rich source of several important nutrients and an important part of the otherwise plant-dominated diet present in Angola. However, fish may also be a source of contaminants. The aim of this study was to analyse the nutrient contents and the levels of chemical contaminants, including arsenic, cadmium, mercury, and lead, in five commonly consumed marine fish species sampled during a survey with the research vessel Dr. Fridtjof Nansen in Angola. The species’ contribution to recommended nutrient intakes (RNI) for women and children was assessed and compared to that of food products of terrestrial animal origin. All the sampled species are good sources of protein and micronutrients if included in the diet, and inter-species variation is evident. The species were identified to contribute 5–15% of the RNI for calcium, iron, iodine, and zinc and exceeded the contribution to protein and iron intakes of food products of terrestrial animal origin. Furthermore, the potential consumer exposure to chemical contaminants in the species was assessed. None of the species exceeded the maximum levels for cadmium, mercury, and lead, and the potential consumer exposure to cadmium and methylmercury was considered low. The data presented in this study represent an important contribution to African food composition tables. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrients; fish; contaminants; Angola; metals; marine; recommended nutrient intake; exposure assessment; minerals; food composition data nutrients; fish; contaminants; Angola; metals; marine; recommended nutrient intake; exposure assessment; minerals; food composition data
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Moxness Reksten, A.; Joao Correia Victor, A.M.; Baptista Nascimento Neves, E.; Myhre Christiansen, S.; Ahern, M.; Uzomah, A.; Lundebye, A.-K.; Kolding, J.; Kjellevold, M. Nutrient and Chemical Contaminant Levels in Five Marine Fish Species from Angola—The EAF-Nansen Programme. Foods 2020, 9, 629.

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