Next Article in Journal
Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and the Intestinal Epithelium—A Review
Next Article in Special Issue
Safety and Transfer Study: Transfer of Bromoform Present in Asparagopsis taxiformis to Milk and Urine of Lactating Dairy Cows
Previous Article in Journal
Native Species Facing Climate Changes: Response of Calafate Berries to Low Temperature and UV Radiation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Freshness Quality and Shelf Life Evaluation of the Seaweed Ulva rigida through Physical, Chemical, Microbiological, and Sensory Methods
Review

Vitamin C from Seaweed: A Review Assessing Seaweed as Contributor to Daily Intake

1
Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Sem Sælandsvei 6/8, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
2
National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2021, 10(1), 198; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010198
Received: 15 December 2020 / Revised: 11 January 2021 / Accepted: 14 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment of Food Quality and Safety of Cultivated Macroalgae)
Seaweeds are indiscriminately said to contain significant amounts of vitamin C, but seaweeds are a diverse group, which may limit the ability to generalize. Several studies have been performed on vitamin C in seaweed, and this review covers these findings, and concludes on how much vitamin C is found in seaweeds. A systematic review of vitamin C in 92 seaweed species was conducted followed by analyzing the 132 data entries. The average vitamin C content was 0.773 mg g−1 seaweed in dry weight with a 90th percentile of 2.06 mg g−1 dry weight. The vitamin C content was evaluated based on taxonomical categories of green, brown and red seaweeds (Chlorophyta (phylum), Phaeophyceae (class), and Rhodophyta (phylum)), and no significant differences were found between them. The vitamin C content was compared to other food sources, and this showed that seaweeds can contribute to the daily vitamin C intake, but are not a rich source. Moreover, seasonal variations, analytical methods, and processing impacts were also evaluated. View Full-Text
Keywords: ascorbic acid; macroalgae; comparison; food; quality; consumption; processing; recommended nutrient intake; dietary reference intake; seasonal variation; analyses; taxonomy ascorbic acid; macroalgae; comparison; food; quality; consumption; processing; recommended nutrient intake; dietary reference intake; seasonal variation; analyses; taxonomy
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Nielsen, C.W.; Rustad, T.; Holdt, S.L. Vitamin C from Seaweed: A Review Assessing Seaweed as Contributor to Daily Intake. Foods 2021, 10, 198. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010198

AMA Style

Nielsen CW, Rustad T, Holdt SL. Vitamin C from Seaweed: A Review Assessing Seaweed as Contributor to Daily Intake. Foods. 2021; 10(1):198. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010198

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nielsen, Cecilie W., Turid Rustad, and Susan L. Holdt 2021. "Vitamin C from Seaweed: A Review Assessing Seaweed as Contributor to Daily Intake" Foods 10, no. 1: 198. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010198

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop