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Open AccessArticle

Blood Pressure Abnormalities Associated with Gut Microbiota-Derived Short Chain Fatty Acids in Children with Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract

1
Department of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan
2
School of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
3
Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan
4
Department of Seafood Science, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan
5
Institute for Translational Research in Biomedicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(8), 1090; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8081090
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 14 July 2019 / Accepted: 19 July 2019 / Published: 24 July 2019
Both kidney disease and hypertension can originate from early life. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Since gut microbiota and their metabolite short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been linked to CKD and hypertension, we examined whether gut microbial composition and SCFAs are correlated with blood pressure (BP) load and renal outcome in CKD children with CAKUT. We enrolled 78 children with CKD stage G1–G4. Up to 65% of children with CAKUT had BP abnormalities on 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). CKD children with CAKUT had lower risk of developing BP abnormalities and CKD progression than those with non-CAKUT. Reduced plasma level of propionate was found in children with CAKUT, which was related to increased abundance of phylum Verrucomicrobia, genus Akkermansia, and species Bifidobacterium bifidum. CKD children with abnormal ABPM profile had higher plasma levels of propionate and butyrate. Our findings highlight that gut microbiota-derived SCFAs like propionate and butyrate are related to BP abnormalities in children with an early stage of CKD. Early assessments of these microbial markers may aid in developing potential targets for early life intervention for lifelong hypertension prevention in childhood CKD. View Full-Text
Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; butyrate; congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT); cardiovascular disease; children; chronic kidney disease; gut microbiota; hypertension; propionate; short chain fatty acid ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; butyrate; congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT); cardiovascular disease; children; chronic kidney disease; gut microbiota; hypertension; propionate; short chain fatty acid
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Hsu, C.-N.; Lu, P.-C.; Hou, C.-Y.; Tain, Y.-L. Blood Pressure Abnormalities Associated with Gut Microbiota-Derived Short Chain Fatty Acids in Children with Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1090.

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