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Benign Giant Cell Lesion of C1 Lateral Mass: A Case Report and Literature Review

1
Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
2
Center for Perinatal Biology, Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University, 11234 Anderson Street, Room 2567, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
3
Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
4
Department of Pathology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
5
Department of Neurosurgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, Room 2556, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(5), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9050105
Received: 24 March 2019 / Revised: 6 May 2019 / Accepted: 7 May 2019 / Published: 8 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surgery for Spine Disease and Intractable Pain)
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Abstract

Primary osseous tumors of the spinal column account for approximately 1% of the total number of spinal tumors found in the pediatric patient population. The authors present a case of a C1 benign giant cell lesion that was incidentally found in a 15-year-old patient. A transoral biopsy was performed followed by treatment with denosumab, with definitive management in the form of transoral tumor resection with subsequent occiput-cervical three posterior instrumented fusion. The patient tolerated all of the procedures well, as there were no post-operative complications, discharged home neurologically intact and was eager to return to school when assessed during a follow-up visit in clinic. Osteolytic lesions affecting the cervical spine are rare in the pediatric population. It is of utmost importance to have sufficient background knowledge in order to formulate a differential diagnosis, as well as an understanding of principles underlying surgical techniques required to prevent occipital-cervical instability in this patient population. The information presented will guide surgical decision-making by identifying the patient population that would benefit from neurosurgical interventions to stabilize the atlantoaxial junction, in the context of rare osteolytic conditions affecting the cervical spine. View Full-Text
Keywords: pain; spine; spinal disease; transoral; atlantoaxial; surgery pain; spine; spinal disease; transoral; atlantoaxial; surgery
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Heinrich, C.; Gospodarev, V.; Kheradpour, A.; Zuppan, C.; Douglas, C.C.; Minasian, T. Benign Giant Cell Lesion of C1 Lateral Mass: A Case Report and Literature Review. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 105.

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