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Open AccessReview

A Homeostatic Model of Subjective Cognitive Decline

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2
Department of Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
3
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(12), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8120228
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 3 December 2018 / Accepted: 17 December 2018 / Published: 19 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Aging)
Subjective Cognitive Decline (SCD) is possibly one of the earliest detectable signs of dementia, but we do not know which mental processes lead to elevated concern. In this narrative review, we will summarize the previous literature on the biomarkers and functional neuroanatomy of SCD. In order to extend upon the prevailing theory of SCD, compensatory hyperactivation, we will introduce a new model: the breakdown of homeostasis in the prediction error minimization system. A cognitive prediction error is a discrepancy between an implicit cognitive prediction and the corresponding outcome. Experiencing frequent prediction errors may be a primary source of elevated subjective concern. Our homeostasis breakdown model provides an explanation for the progression from both normal cognition to SCD and from SCD to advanced dementia stages. View Full-Text
Keywords: subjective cognitive decline; preclinical dementia; fMRI; compensation subjective cognitive decline; preclinical dementia; fMRI; compensation
MDPI and ACS Style

Mizuno, A.; Ly, M.; Aizenstein, H.J. A Homeostatic Model of Subjective Cognitive Decline. Brain Sci. 2018, 8, 228.

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