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Article

Age-Related Individual Behavioural Characteristics of Adult Wistar Rats

P.K. Anokhin Research Institute of Normal Physiology, 125315 Moscow, Russia
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Academic Editor: Vera Baumans
Animals 2021, 11(8), 2282; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11082282
Received: 25 June 2021 / Revised: 21 July 2021 / Accepted: 31 July 2021 / Published: 2 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Physiology)
Rats are considered adults from 2 to 5 months. During this period, they are used for experimentation in physiology and pharmacology. Adult rats, depending on their age, can be in a different physiological state, which can influence the results of experiments carried out on them. Despite this, age-related changes in adult rats have not yet been examined. Our results showed that as male and female rats progressed from 2 to 5 months of age there was a decrease in the level of motor and exploratory activities, and an increase in the level of anxiety-like behaviour. Age-related changes were dependent upon initial individual characteristics of behaviour. For example, animals that demonstrated high motor activity at 2 months become significantly less active by 5 months, and animals that showed a low level of anxiety at 2 months become more anxious by 5 months. Low-activity and high-anxiety rats did not show any significant age-related changes from 2 to 5 months of age. The results of this work should be taken into account when choosing the age of rats for conducting behavioural experiments.
The aim of this work was to study age-related changes in the behaviour of adult Wistar rats using the open field (OF) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Behavioural changes related to motor activity and anxiety were of particular interest. Results showed that as male and female rats progressed from 2 to 5 months of age, there was a decrease in the level of motor and exploratory activities and an increase in their level of anxiety. Age-related changes were dependent upon initial individual characteristics of behaviour. For example, animals that demonstrated high motor activity at 2 months become significantly less active by 5 months, and animals that showed a low level of anxiety at 2 months become more anxious by 5 months. Low-activity and high-anxiety rats did not show any significant age-related changes in OF and EPM tests from 2 to 5 months of age, except for a decrease in the number of rearings in the EPM. Thus, the behaviour of the same adult rat at 2 and 5 months of age is significantly different, which may lead to differences in the experimental results of physiological and pharmacological studies using adult animals of different ages. View Full-Text
Keywords: age; behaviour; open field; physical activity; anxiety; Wistar rat age; behaviour; open field; physical activity; anxiety; Wistar rat
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sudakov, S.K.; Alekseeva, E.V.; Nazarova, G.A.; Bashkatova, V.G. Age-Related Individual Behavioural Characteristics of Adult Wistar Rats. Animals 2021, 11, 2282. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11082282

AMA Style

Sudakov SK, Alekseeva EV, Nazarova GA, Bashkatova VG. Age-Related Individual Behavioural Characteristics of Adult Wistar Rats. Animals. 2021; 11(8):2282. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11082282

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sudakov, Sergey K., Elena V. Alekseeva, Galina A. Nazarova, and Valentina G. Bashkatova. 2021. "Age-Related Individual Behavioural Characteristics of Adult Wistar Rats" Animals 11, no. 8: 2282. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11082282

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