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Oranges and Sunshine: The Story of a Traumatic Encounter

Department of English and German Philology, Faculty of Arts, University of Zaragoza, Campus Universitario, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
Academic Editor: Sonya Andermahr
Humanities 2015, 4(4), 714-725; https://doi.org/10.3390/h4040714
Received: 31 July 2015 / Revised: 11 October 2015 / Accepted: 13 October 2015 / Published: 20 October 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Decolonizing Trauma Studies: Trauma and Postcolonialism)
This paper will rely on some well-known theories on trauma, memory and ethics to study how Jim Loach’s debut film Oranges and Sunshine (2010) testifies to the traumatic deportation of up to 150,000 British children to distant parts of the Empire, mainly Australia, until 1970. Oranges and Sunshine was based on Margaret Humphreys’ moving memoir, originally entitled Empty Cradles (1994) but later re-titled Oranges and Sunshine after Loach’s film. What these two texts basically claim is the need to recover historic memory through heart-breaking acts of remembrance, which can alone denounce the atrocities that were concomitant with the colonial enterprise and pave the way for disclosing and working through individual and collective traumas. View Full-Text
Keywords: Jim Loach; Margaret Humphreys; trauma theory; memory studies; Australian studies; postcolonial trauma; Lost Children of Empire; biopolitics; missing person; homo sacer Jim Loach; Margaret Humphreys; trauma theory; memory studies; Australian studies; postcolonial trauma; Lost Children of Empire; biopolitics; missing person; homo sacer
MDPI and ACS Style

Herrero, D. Oranges and Sunshine: The Story of a Traumatic Encounter. Humanities 2015, 4, 714-725.

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