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Viscoelastic Hemostatic Assays: Moving from the Laboratory to the Site of Care—A Review of Established and Emerging Technologies

1
Haemonetics Corporation, Boston, MA 02110, USA
2
Haemonetics SA, Signy CH, 1274 Signy-Centre, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diagnostics 2020, 10(2), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10020118
Received: 28 January 2020 / Revised: 17 February 2020 / Accepted: 19 February 2020 / Published: 21 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Point-of-Care Detection Devices for Healthcare)
Viscoelastic-based techniques to evaluate whole blood hemostasis have advanced substantially since they were first developed over 70 years ago but are still based upon the techniques first described by Dr. Hellmut Hartert in 1948. Today, the use of thromboelastography, the method of testing viscoelastic properties of blood coagulation, has moved out of the research laboratory and is now more widespread, used commonly during surgery, in emergency departments, intensive care units, and in labor wards. Thromboelastography is currently a rapidly growing field of technological advancement and is attracting significant investment. This review will first describe the history of the viscoelastic testing and the established first-generation devices, which were developed for use within the laboratory. This review will then describe the next-generation hemostasis monitoring devices, which were developed for use at the site of care for an expanding range of clinical applications. This review will then move on to experimental technologies, which promise to make viscoelastic testing more readily available in a wider range of clinical environments in the endeavor to improve patient care. View Full-Text
Keywords: blood; coagulation; hemostasis; point of care; ROTEM; TEG; thromboelastography; VHA; viscoelastic testing blood; coagulation; hemostasis; point of care; ROTEM; TEG; thromboelastography; VHA; viscoelastic testing
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Hartmann, J.; Murphy, M.; Dias, J.D. Viscoelastic Hemostatic Assays: Moving from the Laboratory to the Site of Care—A Review of Established and Emerging Technologies. Diagnostics 2020, 10, 118.

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