Next Article in Journal
Research about Organic Matter Removal and Biofilms Development of Pilot-Scale UV/H2O2-BAC Process
Previous Article in Journal
Trend Analyses of Baseflow and BFI for Undisturbed Watersheds in Michigan—Constraints from Multi-Objective Optimization
Previous Article in Special Issue
Barrier Islands Resilience to Extreme Events: Do Earthquake and Tsunami Play a Role?
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Terraced Landforms Onshore and Offshore the Cilento Promontory (South-Eastern Tyrrhenian Margin) and Their Significance as Quaternary Records of Sea Level Changes

1
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano Bicocca (DISAT), 20126 Milan, Italy
2
CoNISMa, Local Research Unit, University of Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milan, Italy
3
Independent Researcher, 80138 Naples, Italy
4
Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie, Università del Sannio, 82100 Benevento, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giorgio Anfuso
Water 2021, 13(4), 566; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040566
Received: 31 December 2020 / Revised: 15 February 2021 / Accepted: 17 February 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscapes and Landforms of Terrestrial and Marine Areas)
Climate change and tectonic uplift are the dominant forcing mechanisms responsible for the formation of long and narrow terraced landforms in a variety of geomorphic settings; and marine terraces are largely used to reconstruct the Quaternary glacial and interglacial climates. Along the Mediterranean coast, a considerable number of popular scientific articles have acknowledged a range of marine terraces in the form of low-relief surfaces resulting from the combined effects of tectonic uplift and eustatic sea-level fluctuations, as relevant geomorphological indicators of past sea-level high-stands. With the exception of a few recent studies on the significance of submarine depositional terraces (SDT), submerged terraced landforms have been less investigated. By integrating different marine and terrestrial datasets, our work brings together and re-examines numerous terraced landforms that typify the Cilento Promontory and its offshore region. In this area, studies since the 1960s have allowed the recognition of well-defined Middle to Upper Pleistocene marine terraces on land, while only a few studies have investigated the occurrences of late Pleistocene SDT. Furthermore, to date, no studies have consistently integrated findings. For our work, we correlated major evidence of emerged and submarine terraced landforms in order to support an improved understanding of the tectono-geomorphological evolution of the Cilento Promontory and to further clarify the geomorphological significance of submerged terraces. View Full-Text
Keywords: marine terraces; submarine geomorphology; coastal geomorphology; sea level oscillation; Tyrrhenian margin marine terraces; submarine geomorphology; coastal geomorphology; sea level oscillation; Tyrrhenian margin
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Savini, A.; Bracchi, V.A.; Cammarosano, A.; Pennetta, M.; Russo, F. Terraced Landforms Onshore and Offshore the Cilento Promontory (South-Eastern Tyrrhenian Margin) and Their Significance as Quaternary Records of Sea Level Changes. Water 2021, 13, 566. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040566

AMA Style

Savini A, Bracchi VA, Cammarosano A, Pennetta M, Russo F. Terraced Landforms Onshore and Offshore the Cilento Promontory (South-Eastern Tyrrhenian Margin) and Their Significance as Quaternary Records of Sea Level Changes. Water. 2021; 13(4):566. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040566

Chicago/Turabian Style

Savini, Alessandra; Bracchi, Valentina A.; Cammarosano, Antonella; Pennetta, Micla; Russo, Filippo. 2021. "Terraced Landforms Onshore and Offshore the Cilento Promontory (South-Eastern Tyrrhenian Margin) and Their Significance as Quaternary Records of Sea Level Changes" Water 13, no. 4: 566. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040566

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop