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Article

Infrastructure Shaming and Consequences for Management of Urban WEF Security Nexus in China and India

Chair of Urban Water Systems Engineering, Department of Civil, Geo and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Munich (TUM), 80333 München, Germany
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Academic Editor: Larry Swatuk
Water 2021, 13(3), 267; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030267
Received: 1 December 2020 / Revised: 5 January 2021 / Accepted: 16 January 2021 / Published: 22 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Water-Energy-Food Security Nexus)
Worldwide, consumption of resources such as water, energy and food continues to rise exponentially despite environmental and climatic change related challenges. Centralized sewerage systems continue to be implemented worldwide despite being very water and energy intensive, and although this is not always the best option for regions facing water scarcity. Deploying the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) Nexus approach, particularly through alternative technology options that can support decentralized water reclamation with integrated resource recovery, can enable resource conservation and more effective management of the WEF security Nexus for local governments with limited capacities. However, a certain pattern of “business as usual” infrastructure development and investment linked to infrastructure shaming continuously reinforces implementation of centralized sewerage systems, thereby hampering deployment of alternative technology options. This study uses two typical case study towns, Shaxi in China and Leh in India, to describe this pattern. The study finds that alternative technology approaches were in place in both towns. Yet after international consulting companies got involved, centralized sewerage systems were implemented despite limited water availability and large segments of the population not having flush toilets. This study discusses management of the WEF security Nexus implications thereof in the context of cities worldwide and a systemic socio-technical transition to a circular economy. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; natural resources conservation; urban Water-Energy-Food (WEF) security Nexus; water reclamation with integrated resource recovery; China; India climate change; natural resources conservation; urban Water-Energy-Food (WEF) security Nexus; water reclamation with integrated resource recovery; China; India
MDPI and ACS Style

Gondhalekar, D.; Drewes, J.E. Infrastructure Shaming and Consequences for Management of Urban WEF Security Nexus in China and India. Water 2021, 13, 267. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030267

AMA Style

Gondhalekar D, Drewes JE. Infrastructure Shaming and Consequences for Management of Urban WEF Security Nexus in China and India. Water. 2021; 13(3):267. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030267

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gondhalekar, Daphne, and Jörg E. Drewes. 2021. "Infrastructure Shaming and Consequences for Management of Urban WEF Security Nexus in China and India" Water 13, no. 3: 267. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030267

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