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Article

Effect of Rainfall and pH on Musty Odor Produced in the Sanbe Reservoir

1
Estuary Research Center, Shimane University, Nishikawatsu-cho 1060, Matsue 690-8504, Japan
2
Faculty of Life and Environmental Science, Shimane University, Nishikawatsu-cho 1060, Matsue 690-8504, Japan
3
Faculty of Education, Shimane University, Nishikawatsu-cho 1060, Matsue 690-8504, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Krystian Obolewski and Mirosław Grzybowski
Water 2021, 13(24), 3600; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243600
Received: 28 October 2021 / Revised: 9 December 2021 / Accepted: 11 December 2021 / Published: 15 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Assessment and Ecological Monitoring in Aquatic System)
Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are continuously formed in water systems such as reservoirs and lakes around the world. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) produced by some species of cyanobacteria have caused odor problems in the drinking water of the Sanbe Reservoir in Japan. Field observations were conducted for four years (2015–2019) to investigate the cause of this musty odor. It was found that geosmin was produced by Dolichospermum crassum and Dolichospermum planctonicum (cyanobacteria), and 2-MIB was due to Pseudanabaena sp. and Aphanizomenon cf. flos-aquae (cyanobacteria). Changes in water temperature and pH caused by rainfall were correlated with changes in the concentration of geosmin and 2-MIB. In particular, geosmin and 2-MIB tended to occur under low rainfall conditions. When there was low rainfall, the reservoir changed to an alkaline state because the phytoplankton consumed CO2 for photosynthesis. In an alkaline reservoir, dissolved inorganic carbon mainly existed in the form of bicarbonate (HCO3). Thus, the results suggest that under such conditions in reservoirs, cyanobacteria grew easily because they could use both CO2 and HCO3 for photosynthesis. Specifically, our study suggests that in order for the musty odor problem in the reservoir to be solved, it is important that the pH of the reservoir be controlled. View Full-Text
Keywords: musty odor; reservoir; geosmin; 2-MIB; pH musty odor; reservoir; geosmin; 2-MIB; pH
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, S.; Hayashi, S.; Masuki, S.; Ayukawa, K.; Ohtani, S.; Seike, Y. Effect of Rainfall and pH on Musty Odor Produced in the Sanbe Reservoir. Water 2021, 13, 3600. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243600

AMA Style

Kim S, Hayashi S, Masuki S, Ayukawa K, Ohtani S, Seike Y. Effect of Rainfall and pH on Musty Odor Produced in the Sanbe Reservoir. Water. 2021; 13(24):3600. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243600

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Sangyeob, Shohei Hayashi, Shingo Masuki, Kazuhiro Ayukawa, Shuji Ohtani, and Yasushi Seike. 2021. "Effect of Rainfall and pH on Musty Odor Produced in the Sanbe Reservoir" Water 13, no. 24: 3600. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243600

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