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Article

Organic Pollutants Removal from Olive Mill Wastewater Using Electrocoagulation Process via Central Composite Design (CCD)

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Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, P.O. Box 41522, Ismailia 54000, Egypt
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Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha 62224, Saudi Arabia
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Environmental Engineering Department, Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology (E-JUST), New Borg El-Arab City 21934, Egypt
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Sanitary Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, P.O. Box 21544, Alexandria 21526, Egypt
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Department of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Jeddah, Jeddah 21419, Saudi Arabia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Laura Bulgariu
Water 2021, 13(24), 3522; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243522
Received: 31 October 2021 / Revised: 25 November 2021 / Accepted: 5 December 2021 / Published: 9 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Water Treatment)
Electrocoagulation (EC) was studied in this study as a potential alternative approach for treating Olive Mill Wastewater (OMW). Aluminum plates were utilized as anode and cathode to evaluate the removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) from OMW and the aluminum electrode’s weight loss. Central Composite Experimental Design (CCD) and Response Surface Methodology were used to optimize its performance. Anodes were weighed before and after each electrocoagulation experiment, to compare the experimental and the theoretical dissolved aluminum weights calculated using Faraday’s law. We discovered the following EC conditions for CCD: current density = 15 mA/cm2, pH = 4, and electrolysis time of 30 min. Under these conditions, the maximum COD removal ratio was 41%, equating to an Al weight loss of 288.89 g/m3 at an estimated operating cost of 1.60 USD/m3. According to the response optimizer, the most economical operating settings for COD removal efficiency of 58.888% are pH 4, a current density of 18.41 mA/cm2, electrolysis time of 36.82 min, and Al weight loss of 337.33 g/m3, with a projected running cost of 2.00 USD/m3. View Full-Text
Keywords: anodic dissolution; electrocoagulation; Central Composite Design (CCD); Olive Mill Wastewater (OMW); optimization anodic dissolution; electrocoagulation; Central Composite Design (CCD); Olive Mill Wastewater (OMW); optimization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shahawy, A.E.; Ahmed, I.A.; Nasr, M.; Ragab, A.H.; Al-Mhyawi, S.R.; Elamin, K.M.A. Organic Pollutants Removal from Olive Mill Wastewater Using Electrocoagulation Process via Central Composite Design (CCD). Water 2021, 13, 3522. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243522

AMA Style

Shahawy AE, Ahmed IA, Nasr M, Ragab AH, Al-Mhyawi SR, Elamin KMA. Organic Pollutants Removal from Olive Mill Wastewater Using Electrocoagulation Process via Central Composite Design (CCD). Water. 2021; 13(24):3522. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243522

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shahawy, Abeer E., Inas A. Ahmed, Mahmoud Nasr, Ahmed H. Ragab, Saedah R. Al-Mhyawi, and Khalda M.A. Elamin. 2021. "Organic Pollutants Removal from Olive Mill Wastewater Using Electrocoagulation Process via Central Composite Design (CCD)" Water 13, no. 24: 3522. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243522

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