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Article

Comparison of the Applicability of Different Soil Erosion Models to Predict Soil Erodibility Factor and Event Soil Losses on Loess Slopes in Hungary

1
Institute of Wildlife Management and Nature Conservation, Szent István Campus, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, 2100 Gödöllő, Hungary
2
Geographical Institute, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, 1112 Budapest, Hungary
3
Department of Environmental and Landscape Geography, ELTE University, 1117 Budapest, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maria Mimikou
Water 2021, 13(24), 3517; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243517
Received: 31 October 2021 / Revised: 30 November 2021 / Accepted: 7 December 2021 / Published: 9 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Water Erosion)
Climate change induces more extreme precipitation events, which increase the amount of soil loss. There are continuous requests from the decision-makers in the European Union to provide data on soil loss; the question is, which ones should we use? The paper presents the results of USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation), RUSLE (Revised USLE), USLE-M (USLE-Modified) and EPIC (Erosion-Productivity Impact Calculator) modelling, based on rainfall simulations performed in the Koppány Valley, Hungary. Soil losses were measured during low-, moderate- and high-intensity rainfalls on cultivated soils formed on loess. The soil erodibility values were calculated by the equations of the applied soil erosion models and ranged from 0.0028 to 0.0087 t ha h ha−1 MJ−1 mm−1 for the USLE-related models. EPIC produced larger values. The coefficient of determination resulted in an acceptable correlation between the measured and calculated values only in the case of USLE-M. Based on other statistical indicators (e.g., NSEI, RMSE, PBIAS and relative error), RUSLE, USLE and USLE-M resulted in the best performance. Overall, regardless of being non-physically based models, USLE-type models seem to produce accurate soil erodibility values, thus modelling outputs. View Full-Text
Keywords: rainfall simulation; field measurement; water erosion model; USLE; event scale rainfall simulation; field measurement; water erosion model; USLE; event scale
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MDPI and ACS Style

Keller, B.; Centeri, C.; Szabó, J.A.; Szalai, Z.; Jakab, G. Comparison of the Applicability of Different Soil Erosion Models to Predict Soil Erodibility Factor and Event Soil Losses on Loess Slopes in Hungary. Water 2021, 13, 3517. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243517

AMA Style

Keller B, Centeri C, Szabó JA, Szalai Z, Jakab G. Comparison of the Applicability of Different Soil Erosion Models to Predict Soil Erodibility Factor and Event Soil Losses on Loess Slopes in Hungary. Water. 2021; 13(24):3517. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243517

Chicago/Turabian Style

Keller, Boglárka, Csaba Centeri, Judit A. Szabó, Zoltán Szalai, and Gergely Jakab. 2021. "Comparison of the Applicability of Different Soil Erosion Models to Predict Soil Erodibility Factor and Event Soil Losses on Loess Slopes in Hungary" Water 13, no. 24: 3517. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243517

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