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Article

Fish Assemblages in Seagrass (Zostera marina L.) Meadows and Mussel Reefs (Mytilus edulis): Implications for Coastal Fisheries, Restoration and Marine Spatial Planning

1
Fisheries Research Institute, ELGO-Demeter, Nea Peramos, 64007 Kavala, Greece
2
National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark (DTU Aqua), 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Georgios Sylaios and Ghada El Serafy
Water 2021, 13(22), 3268; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223268
Received: 4 November 2021 / Accepted: 15 November 2021 / Published: 17 November 2021
Seagrass meadows and mussel reefs provide favorable habitats for many fish species, but few studies have compared the associated fish assemblages directly and examined the influence of environmental variables. Knowledge of fish assemblages associated with disparate habitats is needed for the conservation of coastal fisheries and marine spatial planning. Catch per unit effort data derived from fyke nets showed similar species richness and diversity in seagrass meadows and mussel reefs, suggesting that both habitats support elevated marine biodiversity of mobile fauna. However, it was shown that fish assemblage structure differed between those habitats, and also fish abundance in seagrass meadows was significantly higher than in mussel reefs by comparing the data with a multivariate extension of Generalized Linear Models (GLM). Furthermore, employing underwater video recordings to compare fish abundances in high and low water current speed mussel reefs with a Generalized Linear Mixed Model with negative binomial distribution, data revealed similar fish abundances (in terms of the MaxN metric) despite the variation in current speed, probably because the mussel formations provide sufficient shelter, even from high water currents. The commercially important species Atlantic cod (G. morhua), however, was significantly more abundant in the low water current mussel reef. Therefore, restoration efforts targeting G. morhua could benefit from restoring low current mussel reefs. Our study provides input for the conservation of coastal recreational and commercial fisheries, habitat restoration and marine spatial planning where certain habitats may be prioritized. View Full-Text
Keywords: Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua); Baltic Sea; biogenic reef; eelgrass; fish abundance; fish assemblage; fisheries management; flow velocity; restoration Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua); Baltic Sea; biogenic reef; eelgrass; fish abundance; fish assemblage; fisheries management; flow velocity; restoration
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MDPI and ACS Style

Orfanidis, G.A.; Touloumis, K.; Stenberg, C.; Mariani, P.; Støttrup, J.G.; Svendsen, J.C. Fish Assemblages in Seagrass (Zostera marina L.) Meadows and Mussel Reefs (Mytilus edulis): Implications for Coastal Fisheries, Restoration and Marine Spatial Planning. Water 2021, 13, 3268. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223268

AMA Style

Orfanidis GA, Touloumis K, Stenberg C, Mariani P, Støttrup JG, Svendsen JC. Fish Assemblages in Seagrass (Zostera marina L.) Meadows and Mussel Reefs (Mytilus edulis): Implications for Coastal Fisheries, Restoration and Marine Spatial Planning. Water. 2021; 13(22):3268. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223268

Chicago/Turabian Style

Orfanidis, Georgios A., Konstantinos Touloumis, Claus Stenberg, Patrizio Mariani, Josianne G. Støttrup, and Jon C. Svendsen. 2021. "Fish Assemblages in Seagrass (Zostera marina L.) Meadows and Mussel Reefs (Mytilus edulis): Implications for Coastal Fisheries, Restoration and Marine Spatial Planning" Water 13, no. 22: 3268. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223268

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