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Article

Iron, Phosphorus and Trace Elements in Mussels’ Shells, Water, and Bottom Sediments from the Severnaya Dvina and the Onega River Basins (Northwestern Russia)

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N. Laverov Federal Center for Integrated Arctic Research of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Northern Dvina Emb. 23, 163000 Arkhangelsk, Russia
2
Geosciences and Environment Toulouse, UMR 5563 CNRS, 31400 Toulouse, France
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BIO-GEO-CLIM Laboratory, Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michael Twiss
Water 2021, 13(22), 3227; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223227
Received: 28 September 2021 / Revised: 9 November 2021 / Accepted: 9 November 2021 / Published: 14 November 2021
Trace elements in freshwater bivalve shells are widely used for reconstructing long-term changes in the riverine environments. However, Northern Eurasian regions, notably the European Russian North, susceptible to strong environmental impact via both local pollution and climate warming, are poorly studied. This work reports new data on trace elements accumulation by widespread species of freshwater mussels Unio spp. and Anodonta anatina in the Severnaya Dvina and the Onega River Basin, the two largest subarctic river basins in the Northeastern Europe. We revealed that iron and phosphorous accumulation in Unio spp. and Anodonta anatina shells have a strong relationship with a distance from the mouth of the studied river (the Severnaya Dvina). Based on multiparametric statistics comprising chemical composition of shells, water, and sediments, we demonstrated that the accumulation of elements in the shell depends on the environment of the biotope. Differences in the elemental composition of shells between different taxa are associated with ecological preferences of certain species to the substrate. The results set new constraints for the use of freshwater mussels’ shells for monitoring riverine environments and performing paleo-reconstructions. View Full-Text
Keywords: freshwater mussels; trace elements; biominerals; bioindicators; Northeastern Europe; boreal; subarctic; river freshwater mussels; trace elements; biominerals; bioindicators; Northeastern Europe; boreal; subarctic; river
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lyubas, A.A.; Tomilova, A.A.; Chupakov, A.V.; Vikhrev, I.V.; Travina, O.V.; Orlov, A.S.; Zubrii, N.A.; Kondakov, A.V.; Bolotov, I.N.; Pokrovsky, O.S. Iron, Phosphorus and Trace Elements in Mussels’ Shells, Water, and Bottom Sediments from the Severnaya Dvina and the Onega River Basins (Northwestern Russia). Water 2021, 13, 3227. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223227

AMA Style

Lyubas AA, Tomilova AA, Chupakov AV, Vikhrev IV, Travina OV, Orlov AS, Zubrii NA, Kondakov AV, Bolotov IN, Pokrovsky OS. Iron, Phosphorus and Trace Elements in Mussels’ Shells, Water, and Bottom Sediments from the Severnaya Dvina and the Onega River Basins (Northwestern Russia). Water. 2021; 13(22):3227. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223227

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lyubas, Artem A., Alena A. Tomilova, Artem V. Chupakov, Ilya V. Vikhrev, Oksana V. Travina, Alexander S. Orlov, Natalia A. Zubrii, Alexander V. Kondakov, Ivan N. Bolotov, and Oleg S. Pokrovsky. 2021. "Iron, Phosphorus and Trace Elements in Mussels’ Shells, Water, and Bottom Sediments from the Severnaya Dvina and the Onega River Basins (Northwestern Russia)" Water 13, no. 22: 3227. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223227

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