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Article

Investigating Behavior of Six Methods for Sediment Transport Capacity Estimation of Spatial-Temporal Soil Erosion

1
Department of Advanced Science and Technology Convergence, Kyungpook National University, 2559 Gyeongsang-daero, Sangju 37224, Korea
2
Disaster Prevention Emergency Management Institute, Kyungpook National University, 2559 Gyeongsang-daero, Sangju 37224, Korea
3
Faculty of Water Resources Engineering, Thuyloi University, 175 Tay Son, Dong Da, Hanoi 100000, Vietnam
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giuseppe Bombino
Water 2021, 13(21), 3054; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213054
Received: 6 September 2021 / Revised: 21 October 2021 / Accepted: 29 October 2021 / Published: 1 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Soil Erosion and Sediment Transport in Catchment)
Estimation of sediment transport capacity (STC) plays a crucial role in simulating soil erosion using any physics-based models. In this research, we aim to investigate the pros and cons of six popular STC methods (namely, Shear velocity, Kilinc-Richardson (KR), Effective stream power, Slope and unit discharge, Englund-Hansen (EH), and Unit stream power) for soil erosion/deposition simulation at watershed scales. An in-depth analysis was performed using the selected STC methods integrated into the Grid Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis model for investigating the changes in morphology at spatial-temporal scales at the Cheoncheon watershed, South Korea, over three storm events. Conclusions were drawn as follows. (1) Due to the ability of the KR and EH methods to include an additional parameter (i.e., erodibility coefficient), they outperformed others by producing more accurate simulation results of sediment concentration predictions. The KR method also proved to be superior to the EH method when it showed a more suitable for sediment concentration simulations with a wide range of sediment size and forcing magnitude. (2) We further selected 2 STC methods among the 6 methods to deeply explore the spatial distribution of erosion/deposition. The overall results were more agreeable. For instance, the phenomenon of erosion mainly occurred upstream of watersheds with steep slopes and unbalanced initial sediment concentrations, whereas deposition typically appeared at locations with flat terrain (or along the mainstream). The EH method demonstrated the influence of topography (e.g., gradient slope) on accretionary erosion/deposition results more significantly than the KR method. The obtained results contribute a new understanding of rainfall-sediment-runoff processes and provide fundamental plans for soil conservation in watersheds. View Full-Text
Keywords: sediment transport capacity; rainfall-runoff; erosion; deposition; GSSHA sediment transport capacity; rainfall-runoff; erosion; deposition; GSSHA
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MDPI and ACS Style

Van, L.N.; Le, X.-H.; Nguyen, G.V.; Yeon, M.; Jung, S.; Lee, G. Investigating Behavior of Six Methods for Sediment Transport Capacity Estimation of Spatial-Temporal Soil Erosion. Water 2021, 13, 3054. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213054

AMA Style

Van LN, Le X-H, Nguyen GV, Yeon M, Jung S, Lee G. Investigating Behavior of Six Methods for Sediment Transport Capacity Estimation of Spatial-Temporal Soil Erosion. Water. 2021; 13(21):3054. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Van, Linh Nguyen, Xuan-Hien Le, Giang V. Nguyen, Minho Yeon, Sungho Jung, and Giha Lee. 2021. "Investigating Behavior of Six Methods for Sediment Transport Capacity Estimation of Spatial-Temporal Soil Erosion" Water 13, no. 21: 3054. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213054

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