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Article

Ascomycetes versus Spent Mushroom Substrate in Mycoremediation of Dredged Sediments Contaminated by Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons: The Involvement of the Bacterial Metabolism

1
Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
2
BD Biodigressioni srl, 56127 Pisa, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chao Yang
Water 2021, 13(21), 3040; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213040
Received: 11 October 2021 / Revised: 22 October 2021 / Accepted: 22 October 2021 / Published: 1 November 2021
Two mycoremediation approaches for the depletion of the total petroleum hydrocarbons in dredged sediments were compared: co-composting with spent mushroom substrate (SMS) from Pleurotus ostreatus and bioaugmentation with Lambertella sp. MUT 5852, an ascomycetes autochthonous to the sediment, capable of utilizing diesel oil its sole carbon source. After 28 days of incubation, 99% depletion was observed in presence of Lambertella sp. MUT 5852. No total petroleum hydrocarbon depletion was observed in sediment co-composting with the SMS after 60 days of incubation. 16S rDNA metabarcoding of the bacterial community was performed to evaluate the potential synergism between fungi and bacteria in the bioremediation process. The functional metagenomic prediction approach indicated that the biodiversity of the bacterial genera potentially involved in the degradation of TPH was higher in sediment bioaugmented with Lambertella sp. MUT 5852, which resulted in being mandatory for TPH depletion. Mechanisms of co-substrate inhibition of the hydrocarburoclastic bacterial species, due to the bioavailable organic matter of the SMS, are suggested to be involved in the observed kinetics of TPH depletion, failing in the case of SMS and successful in the case of Lambertella sp. MUT 5852. View Full-Text
Keywords: mycoremediation; Lambertella sp. MUT 5852; Pleurotus ostreatus; predictive functional metagenomic analysis; synergism between fungi and bacteria; total petroleum hydrocarbon depletion; spent mushroom substrate mycoremediation; Lambertella sp. MUT 5852; Pleurotus ostreatus; predictive functional metagenomic analysis; synergism between fungi and bacteria; total petroleum hydrocarbon depletion; spent mushroom substrate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Becarelli, S.; Siracusa, G.; Chicca, I.; Bernabei, G.; Di Gregorio, S. Ascomycetes versus Spent Mushroom Substrate in Mycoremediation of Dredged Sediments Contaminated by Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons: The Involvement of the Bacterial Metabolism. Water 2021, 13, 3040. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213040

AMA Style

Becarelli S, Siracusa G, Chicca I, Bernabei G, Di Gregorio S. Ascomycetes versus Spent Mushroom Substrate in Mycoremediation of Dredged Sediments Contaminated by Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons: The Involvement of the Bacterial Metabolism. Water. 2021; 13(21):3040. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213040

Chicago/Turabian Style

Becarelli, Simone, Giovanna Siracusa, Ilaria Chicca, Giacomo Bernabei, and Simona Di Gregorio. 2021. "Ascomycetes versus Spent Mushroom Substrate in Mycoremediation of Dredged Sediments Contaminated by Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons: The Involvement of the Bacterial Metabolism" Water 13, no. 21: 3040. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213040

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