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Article

Forensic Investigation of Four Monitored Green Infrastructure Inlets

1
Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, USA
2
Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ryan Winston and Peter Weiss
Water 2021, 13(13), 1787; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131787
Received: 16 April 2021 / Revised: 15 June 2021 / Accepted: 17 June 2021 / Published: 28 June 2021
Green infrastructure (GI) is viewed as a sustainable approach to stormwater management that is being rapidly implemented, outpacing the ability of researchers to compare the effectiveness of alternate design configurations. This paper investigated inflow data collected at four GI inlets. The performance of these four GI inlets, all of which were engineered with the same inlet lengths and shapes, was evaluated through field monitoring. A forensic interpretation of the observed inlet performance was conducted using conclusions regarding the role of inlet clogging and inflow rate as described in the previously published work. The mean inlet efficiency (meanPE), which represents the percentage of tributary area runoff that enters the inlet was 65% for the Nashville inlet, while at Happyland the NW inlet averaged 30%, the SW inlet 25%, and the SE inlet 10%, considering all recorded events during the monitoring periods. The analysis suggests that inlet clogging was the main reason for lower inlet efficiency at the SW and NW inlets, while for the SE inlet, performance was compromised by a reverse cross slope of the street. Spatial variability of rainfall, measurement uncertainty, uncertain tributary catchment area, and inlet depression characteristics are also correlated with inlet PE. The research suggests that placement of monitoring sensors should consider low flow conditions and a strategy to measure them. Additional research on the role of various maintenance protocols in inlet hydraulics is recommended. View Full-Text
Keywords: stormwater green infrastructure performance; forensic investigation of GI; monitoring green infrastructure performance; sustainable urban water management stormwater green infrastructure performance; forensic investigation of GI; monitoring green infrastructure performance; sustainable urban water management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shevade, L.J.; Montalto, F.A. Forensic Investigation of Four Monitored Green Infrastructure Inlets. Water 2021, 13, 1787. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131787

AMA Style

Shevade LJ, Montalto FA. Forensic Investigation of Four Monitored Green Infrastructure Inlets. Water. 2021; 13(13):1787. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131787

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shevade, Leena J., and Franco A. Montalto 2021. "Forensic Investigation of Four Monitored Green Infrastructure Inlets" Water 13, no. 13: 1787. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131787

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