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Article

A Modelling Study of the Impact of On-Road Diesel Emissions on Arctic Black Carbon and Solar Radiation Transfer

Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ivar S.A. Isaksen
Atmosphere 2015, 6(3), 318-340; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos6030318
Received: 29 December 2014 / Revised: 19 February 2015 / Accepted: 3 March 2015 / Published: 12 March 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate-Chemistry Interactions)
Market strategies have greatly incentivized the use of diesel engines for land transportation. These engines are responsible for a large fraction of black carbon (BC) emissions in the extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere, with significant effects on both air quality and global climate. In addition to direct radiative forcing, planetary-scale transport of BC to the Arctic region may significantly impact the surface albedo of this region through wet and dry deposition on ice and snow. A sensitivity study is made with the University of L’Aquila climate-chemistry-aerosol model by eliminating on-road diesel emissions of BC (which represent approximately 50% of BC emissions from land transportation). According to the model and using emission scenarios for the year 2000, this would imply an average change in tropopause direct radiative forcing (RF) of −0.054 W∙m−2 (globally) and −0.074 W∙m−2 over the Arctic region, with a peak of −0.22 W∙m−2 during Arctic springtime months. These RF values increase to −0.064, −0.16 and −0.50 W∙m−2, respectively, when also taking into account the BC snow-albedo forcing. The calculated BC optical thickness decrease (at λ = 0.55 µm) is 0.48 × 10−3 (globally) and 0.74 × 10−3 over the Arctic (i.e., 10.5% and 16.5%, respectively), with a peak of 1.3 × 10−3 during the Arctic springtime. View Full-Text
Keywords: black carbon aerosols; global-scale aerosol model; large-scale atmospheric transport; radiative forcing; snow-albedo forcing black carbon aerosols; global-scale aerosol model; large-scale atmospheric transport; radiative forcing; snow-albedo forcing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; De Luca, N. A Modelling Study of the Impact of On-Road Diesel Emissions on Arctic Black Carbon and Solar Radiation Transfer. Atmosphere 2015, 6, 318-340. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos6030318

AMA Style

Pitari G, Di Genova G, De Luca N. A Modelling Study of the Impact of On-Road Diesel Emissions on Arctic Black Carbon and Solar Radiation Transfer. Atmosphere. 2015; 6(3):318-340. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos6030318

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pitari, Giovanni; Di Genova, Glauco; De Luca, Natalia. 2015. "A Modelling Study of the Impact of On-Road Diesel Emissions on Arctic Black Carbon and Solar Radiation Transfer" Atmosphere 6, no. 3: 318-340. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos6030318

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