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Antibacterial Effects of Cinnamon: From Farm to Food, Cosmetic and Pharmaceutical Industries

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Applied Biotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 19395-5487, Tehran 14359-16471, Iran
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Department of Drug Sciences, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Technology Section, University of Pavia, Pavia 27100, Italy
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Health Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14359-16471, Iran
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Laboratorio de Química Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2015, 7(9), 7729-7748; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7095359
Received: 20 July 2015 / Revised: 26 August 2015 / Accepted: 1 September 2015 / Published: 11 September 2015
Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times, because of their antimicrobial properties increasing the safety and shelf life of food products by acting against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria. Plants have historically been used in traditional medicine as sources of natural antimicrobial substances for the treatment of infectious disease. Therefore, much attention has been paid to medicinal plants as a source of alternative antimicrobial strategies. Moreover, due to the growing demand for preservative-free cosmetics, herbal extracts with antimicrobial activity have recently been used in the cosmetic industry to reduce the risk of allergies connected to the presence of methylparabens. Some species belonging to the genus Cinnamomum, commonly used as spices, contain many antibacterial compounds. This paper reviews the literature published over the last five years regarding the antibacterial effects of cinnamon. In addition, a brief summary of the history, traditional uses, phytochemical constituents, and clinical impact of cinnamon is provided. View Full-Text
Keywords: cinnamon; antibacterial activity; infectious diseases; spice; eugenol; cinnamaldehyde cinnamon; antibacterial activity; infectious diseases; spice; eugenol; cinnamaldehyde
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Nabavi, S.F.; Di Lorenzo, A.; Izadi, M.; Sobarzo-Sánchez, E.; Daglia, M.; Nabavi, S.M. Antibacterial Effects of Cinnamon: From Farm to Food, Cosmetic and Pharmaceutical Industries. Nutrients 2015, 7, 7729-7748.

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