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Communication

COVID-19 Pandemic and Reimagination of Multilateralism through Global Health Diplomacy

1
Department of South and Central Asian Studies, School of International Studies, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda 151401, India
2
Department of Sociology, Khalsa College, Putligarh, Amritsar 143002, India
3
Division of Occupational Medicine, Department of Medicine, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada
4
Department of Public Health, Saveetha Medical College and Hospitals, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077, India
5
Institute of International Relations, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ans Vercammen
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11551; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011551
Received: 13 August 2021 / Revised: 25 September 2021 / Accepted: 17 October 2021 / Published: 19 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Public Health and Social Science on COVID-19)
The ongoing pandemic COVID-19 has made it very clear that no one is safe until everyone is safe. But how can everyone be safe when the pandemic has broken every nerve of the economy and put an extra burden on the already crippled healthcare systems in low-income countries? Thus, the pandemic has changed the orientation of domestic as well as global politics, with many geopolitical shifts. The exponential growing infected cases and more than four million deaths has demanded a global response in terms of multilateralism. However, declining multilateralism and the need for its reforms was a much-delayed response. Given this context, this paper aimed to link the decline of multilateralism in the face of the pandemic by highlighting various instances of its failure and success; and highlighting the need for its revival. The article critically examines and evaluates the responses of multilateralism and global health diplomacy (GHD) during the pandemic. The ongoing black swan kind of event (an unexpected event) has obligated global leadership to think in terms of the revival of multilateralism through GHD. Historically, multilateralism through GHD has been shown to play an important role in managing and combating pandemics. The article further discusses various theoretical aspects such as sovereignty and hegemonic stability theory as reasons for the failing of multilateralism. The paper concludes by emphasizing the importance of foresight in reviving multilateralism in the pursuit of a more sustainable future. View Full-Text
Keywords: multilateralism; sovereignty; COVID-19; pandemic; global health diplomacy; vaccine diplomacy; global health multilateralism; sovereignty; COVID-19; pandemic; global health diplomacy; vaccine diplomacy; global health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gupta, N.; Singh, B.; Kaur, J.; Singh, S.; Chattu, V.K. COVID-19 Pandemic and Reimagination of Multilateralism through Global Health Diplomacy. Sustainability 2021, 13, 11551. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011551

AMA Style

Gupta N, Singh B, Kaur J, Singh S, Chattu VK. COVID-19 Pandemic and Reimagination of Multilateralism through Global Health Diplomacy. Sustainability. 2021; 13(20):11551. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011551

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gupta, Nippun, Bawa Singh, Jaspal Kaur, Sandeep Singh, and Vijay Kumar Chattu. 2021. "COVID-19 Pandemic and Reimagination of Multilateralism through Global Health Diplomacy" Sustainability 13, no. 20: 11551. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011551

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