Next Article in Journal
Transitioning to Low-Carbon Economies under the 2030 Agenda: Minimizing Trade-Offs and Enhancing Co-Benefits of Climate-Change Action for the SDGs
Next Article in Special Issue
Facilitating Safe FFF 3D Printing: A Prototype Material Case Study
Previous Article in Journal
An Innovative Simulation Agent-Based Model for the Combined Sea-Road Transport as a DSS
Previous Article in Special Issue
Design for Additive Manufacturing: A Systematic Review
 
 
Article

A Holistic View on Sustainability in Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing: A Comparative Empirical Study of Eyewear Production Systems

1
Center for Marketing and Supply Chain Management, Nyenrode Business University, 3621 BG Breukelen, The Netherlands
2
First Consulting, 1016 BX Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Materialise N. V., 3001 Leuven, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mohammad Reza Khosravani and Payam Soltani
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10775; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910775
Received: 12 August 2021 / Revised: 13 September 2021 / Accepted: 24 September 2021 / Published: 28 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability of Additive Manufacturing and 3D-Printed Parts)
To achieve sustainability across the product life cycle, attention to the production process is a prerequisite. As a result of technological advancements, innovation and inventions in production methods are in full swing. Production methods that enable mass customisation (MC) are one of the recent developments in the production domain. This study aims to empirically explore the sustainability impact of two MC-oriented production methods, namely, additive manufacturing (i.e., Selective Laser Sintering) and subtractive manufacturing (Computer Numerical Control Milling) within two complete production lines (i.e., from raw material to assembly) for a wearable product. In the context of the triple bottom line framework, the production lines are analysed from an economic, environmental, and social standpoint. A Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) is used to quantify and compare both production systems with their inherent variability in a dynamic setting of fluctuating order volume and diversity. The findings of the simulation are qualitatively evaluated using expert interviews. This study provides a detailed insight into several sustainability trade-offs in production systems where additive and subtractive manufacturing are involved. View Full-Text
Keywords: additive manufacturing; computer numerical control; sustainability; simulation; holistic assessment; mass customisation additive manufacturing; computer numerical control; sustainability; simulation; holistic assessment; mass customisation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Solaimani, S.; Parandian, A.; Nabiollahi, N. A Holistic View on Sustainability in Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing: A Comparative Empirical Study of Eyewear Production Systems. Sustainability 2021, 13, 10775. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910775

AMA Style

Solaimani S, Parandian A, Nabiollahi N. A Holistic View on Sustainability in Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing: A Comparative Empirical Study of Eyewear Production Systems. Sustainability. 2021; 13(19):10775. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910775

Chicago/Turabian Style

Solaimani, Sam, Alireza Parandian, and Nabi Nabiollahi. 2021. "A Holistic View on Sustainability in Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing: A Comparative Empirical Study of Eyewear Production Systems" Sustainability 13, no. 19: 10775. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910775

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop