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Indigenous Heritage Tourism Development in a (Post-)COVID World: Towards Social Justice at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, USA

Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences; Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2261, USA
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Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9484; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229484
Received: 13 October 2020 / Revised: 7 November 2020 / Accepted: 11 November 2020 / Published: 14 November 2020
While a growing body of literature explores tourism impacts in search of sustainable outcomes, research on justice in diverse tourism settings is nascent. Theoretically informed studies drawing from interdisciplinary perspectives are just beginning to emerge to help examine contestations and injustices such as addressed in the case study presented here. The Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (or “Custer’s Last Stand” as some know it; LBH) is a protected heritage tourism site that commemorates a battle between Native American tribes and the U.S. military in 1876. Indigenous stakeholders have struggled for decades with the National Park Service to overturn a long legacy of misrepresentation and exclusion from the commemoration and development of the site for heritage tourism. Site closures and other effects of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic present additional challenges for Native American stakeholders like the Crow Tribe. Guided by Nancy Fraser’s principles of trivalent justice (redistribution, recognition, and representation), this qualitative study traces the conflict over heritage commemoration, and explores the potential for praxis through ethical tourism development and marketing. Fraser’s trivalent approach to justice demonstrates the importance of interdisciplinary research to examine historically entrenched discrimination, redress injustices, and facilitate healing and well-being of diverse groups at sites like LBH. View Full-Text
Keywords: Little Bighorn Battlefield; commemoration; heritage tourism; social justice; Indigenous Tourism; recognition; Nancy Fraser Little Bighorn Battlefield; commemoration; heritage tourism; social justice; Indigenous Tourism; recognition; Nancy Fraser
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wahl, J.; Lee, S.; Jamal, T. Indigenous Heritage Tourism Development in a (Post-)COVID World: Towards Social Justice at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, USA. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9484. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229484

AMA Style

Wahl J, Lee S, Jamal T. Indigenous Heritage Tourism Development in a (Post-)COVID World: Towards Social Justice at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, USA. Sustainability. 2020; 12(22):9484. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229484

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wahl, Jeff; Lee, Seunghoon; Jamal, Tazim. 2020. "Indigenous Heritage Tourism Development in a (Post-)COVID World: Towards Social Justice at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, USA" Sustainability 12, no. 22: 9484. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229484

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