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Open AccessArticle

Is Technical Efficiency Affected by Farmers’ Preference for Mitigation and Adaptation Actions against Climate Change? A Case Study in Northwest Mexico

1
Institute for Research in Sustainability Science and Technology (IS-UPC), Polytechnic University of Catalonia, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
2
Center for Research in Agrofood Economy and Development (CREDA-UPC-IRTA), Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology, 08860 Castelldefels, Spain
3
University of Carthage, Mograne Higher School of Agriculture, LR03AGR02 SPADD, Zaghouan 1121, Tunisie
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(12), 3291; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123291
Received: 25 April 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 10 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coping with Climate Change at Regional Level)
Climate change has adverse effects on agriculture, decreasing crop quality and productivity. This makes it necessary to implement adaptation and mitigation strategies that contribute to the maintenance of technical efficiency (TE). This study analyzed the relationship of TE with farmers’ mitigation and adaptation action preferences, their risk and environmental attitudes, and their perception of climate change. Through the stochastic frontier method, TE levels were estimated for 370 farmers in Northwest Mexico. The results showed the average efficiency levels (57%) for three identified groups of farmers: High TE (15% of farmers), average TE (72%), and low TE (13%). Our results showed a relationship between two of the preferred adaptation actions against climate change estimated using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method. The most efficient farmers preferred “change crops,” while less efficient farmers preferred “invest in irrigation infrastructure.” The anthropocentric environmental attitude inferred from the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) scale was related to the level of TE. Efficient farmers were those with an anthropocentric environmental attitude, compared to less efficient farmers, who exhibited an ecocentric attitude. The climate change issues were more perceived by moderately efficient farmers. These findings set out a roadmap for policy-makers to face climate change at the regional level. View Full-Text
Keywords: technical efficiency; adaptation and mitigation preferences; climate change perception; environmental attitudes; farmers’ risk attitude technical efficiency; adaptation and mitigation preferences; climate change perception; environmental attitudes; farmers’ risk attitude
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MDPI and ACS Style

Orduño Torres, M.A.; Kallas, Z.; Ornelas Herrera, S.I.; Guesmi, B. Is Technical Efficiency Affected by Farmers’ Preference for Mitigation and Adaptation Actions against Climate Change? A Case Study in Northwest Mexico. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3291. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123291

AMA Style

Orduño Torres MA, Kallas Z, Ornelas Herrera SI, Guesmi B. Is Technical Efficiency Affected by Farmers’ Preference for Mitigation and Adaptation Actions against Climate Change? A Case Study in Northwest Mexico. Sustainability. 2019; 11(12):3291. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123291

Chicago/Turabian Style

Orduño Torres, Miguel A.; Kallas, Zein; Ornelas Herrera, Selene I.; Guesmi, Bouali. 2019. "Is Technical Efficiency Affected by Farmers’ Preference for Mitigation and Adaptation Actions against Climate Change? A Case Study in Northwest Mexico" Sustainability 11, no. 12: 3291. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123291

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