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Evaluation of Co-Existence Options of Marine Renewable Energy Projects in Japan

1
Graduate Program in Sustainability Science-Global Leadership Initiative, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Room 334, Building of environmental studies, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8563, Japan
2
Department of Environment Systems, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8563, Japan
3
Department of Ocean Technology, Policy, and Environment, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8563, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(10), 2840; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11102840 (registering DOI)
Received: 26 April 2019 / Revised: 11 May 2019 / Accepted: 13 May 2019 / Published: 18 May 2019
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Abstract

Consensus building among local stakeholders is vital for the success of the proposed initial commercial marine renewable energy (MRE) projects in Japan. Even though the literature on stakeholder acceptance highlights the importance of creating local benefits and co-creation options, very few studies and almost no empirical data have been published on the application of non-monetary benefit creation schemes in the context of MRE. Hence, the purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the possible co-existence options available for Japan’s MRE projects through data collected from interviews and questionnaire surveys in two development sites in Nagasaki and Kitakyushu in Southern Japan. To overcome the limitations of data unavailability and uncertainty, the Dempster Shafer Analytic Hierarchy Process (DS-AHP) was used for evaluating the best co-existence strategy out of five potential options. The results indicate that local fisheries prefer the oceanographic information sharing option whereas most of the other stakeholders prefer using local resources to construct and operate the power plant, creating business involvement opportunities for the local community. Analysis of stakeholders’ decision behaviors suggests that perceived impacts, knowledge, and values influence the preference decision. In addition to the validation of stakeholder preference of the previously proposed co-existence options with empirical data, this study provides a robust method to further evaluate the potential options with the availability of new data. View Full-Text
Keywords: marine renewable energy; co-existence; co-location; Dempster Shafer Analytic Hierarchy Process; multi-criteria analysis marine renewable energy; co-existence; co-location; Dempster Shafer Analytic Hierarchy Process; multi-criteria analysis
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Kularathna, A.S.; Suda, S.; Takagi, K.; Tabeta, S. Evaluation of Co-Existence Options of Marine Renewable Energy Projects in Japan. Sustainability 2019, 11, 2840.

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