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Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3890; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113890

Rainwater Harvesting as a Drinking Water Option for Mexico City

1
Programa Universitario de Estrategias para la Sustentabilidad, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, Mexico
2
Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, Mexico
3
Enrique Lomnitz Climent, Isla Urbana, Epsilon 130, Col. Romero de Terreros, Coyoacán 04310, México
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Dirección General de Atención a la Comunidad, Oficinas exteriores Zona Cultural Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, Mexico.
Received: 22 August 2018 / Revised: 28 September 2018 / Accepted: 10 October 2018 / Published: 26 October 2018
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PDF [1932 KB, uploaded 26 October 2018]
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Abstract

Mexico City is one of the most water-stressed cities in the world; poor quality water occurs in several parts of the City. The use of rainwater harvesting (RWH) as a source of drinking water is gaining acceptance in several contexts, but the quality of the water obtained through these systems has not been sufficiently studied. This manuscript presents the results of water quality tests from samples taken in each component of an RWH system, installed by Isla Urbana at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), southern Mexico City. The RWH system culminates with a drinking fountain which supplies water for the students, and other members of the university community. Samples were retrieved from August 2014 to November 2015, approximately once per month. Results showed that with an adequate operation of the RWH system the major ions, fluoride, zinc, arsenic, lead, iron, copper, chromium, aluminum, nitrate, and total coliforms comply with national standards and international guidelines for drinking water. Thus, RWH constitutes a viable option for providing good quality water in a megacity that will become increasingly water-stressed due to climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: rainwater harvesting system; water quality; sustainability; megacity; heavy metals; contamination rainwater harvesting system; water quality; sustainability; megacity; heavy metals; contamination
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Gispert, M.Í.; Hernández, M.A.A.; Climent, E.L.; Flores, M.F.T. Rainwater Harvesting as a Drinking Water Option for Mexico City. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3890.

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