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Article

Tree Water Status Affects Tree Branch Position

1
School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, 80101 Joensuu, Finland
2
Department of Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry, Finnish Geospatial Research Institute, National Land Survey of Finland, 02431 Masala, Finland
3
Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
4
Institute of Measuring and Modeling for the Built Environment, Aalto University, 00076 Aalto, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Dongsu Choi
Forests 2022, 13(5), 728; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13050728
Received: 16 March 2022 / Revised: 29 April 2022 / Accepted: 4 May 2022 / Published: 6 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecophysiology of Forest Trees and Responses to Environmental Changes)
Physiological processes cause movements of tree stems and branches that occur in a circadian rhythm and over longer time periods, but there is a lack of quantitative understanding of the cause-and-effect relationships. We investigated the movement of tree branches in a long-term drought experiment and at a circadian time scale using time-series of terrestrial laser scanning measurements coupled with measurements of environmental drivers and tree water status. Our results showed that movement of branches was largely explained by leaf water status measured as leaf water potential in a controlled environment for both measured trees (R2 = 0.86 and R2 = 0.75). Our hypothesis is that changes in leaf and branch water status would cause branch movements was further supported by strong relationship between vapor pressure deficit and overnight branch movement (R2 = [0.57–0.74]). Due to lower atmospheric water demand during the nighttime, tree branches settle down as the amount of water in leaves increases. The results indicate that the quantified movement of tree branches could help us to further monitor and understand the water relations of tree communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: diurnal branch movement; drought; diurnal cycles; terrestrial laser scanning; tree monitoring; leaf water content; leaf water potential; vapour pressure deficit (VPD); relative water content diurnal branch movement; drought; diurnal cycles; terrestrial laser scanning; tree monitoring; leaf water content; leaf water potential; vapour pressure deficit (VPD); relative water content
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MDPI and ACS Style

Junttila, S.; Campos, M.; Hölttä, T.; Lindfors, L.; El Issaoui, A.; Vastaranta, M.; Hyyppä, H.; Puttonen, E. Tree Water Status Affects Tree Branch Position. Forests 2022, 13, 728. https://doi.org/10.3390/f13050728

AMA Style

Junttila S, Campos M, Hölttä T, Lindfors L, El Issaoui A, Vastaranta M, Hyyppä H, Puttonen E. Tree Water Status Affects Tree Branch Position. Forests. 2022; 13(5):728. https://doi.org/10.3390/f13050728

Chicago/Turabian Style

Junttila, Samuli, Mariana Campos, Teemu Hölttä, Lauri Lindfors, Aimad El Issaoui, Mikko Vastaranta, Hannu Hyyppä, and Eetu Puttonen. 2022. "Tree Water Status Affects Tree Branch Position" Forests 13, no. 5: 728. https://doi.org/10.3390/f13050728

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