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Materials, Volume 7, Issue 8 (August 2014) , Pages 5427-6104

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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Zeolite Coating on the Corrosion Resistance of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy
Materials 2014, 7(8), 6092-6104; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7086092
Received: 27 June 2014 / Revised: 30 July 2014 / Accepted: 13 August 2014 / Published: 22 August 2014
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3112 | PDF Full-text (1126 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The protective performance of zeolite coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.1 M sodium chloride solution (NaCl). Electrical equivalent circuit (EEC) was developed based upon hypothetical corrosion mechanisms and simulated to correspond to [...] Read more.
The protective performance of zeolite coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.1 M sodium chloride solution (NaCl). Electrical equivalent circuit (EEC) was developed based upon hypothetical corrosion mechanisms and simulated to correspond to the experimental data. The morphology and the chemical nature of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Post corrosion morphologies of the zeolite coated and the uncoated AZ91D alloy were investigated using SEM. The corrosion resistance of the zeolite coated specimen was at least one order of magnitude higher than the uncoated specimen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion of Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers
Materials 2014, 7(8), 6064-6091; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7086064
Received: 23 May 2014 / Revised: 29 July 2014 / Accepted: 13 August 2014 / Published: 22 August 2014
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3074 | PDF Full-text (1635 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP) with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The [...] Read more.
A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP) with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS) curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Advanced Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Modified Powder-in-Tube Technique Based on the Consolidation Processing of Powder Materials for Fabricating Specialty Optical Fibers
Materials 2014, 7(8), 6045-6063; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7086045
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 22 July 2014 / Accepted: 12 August 2014 / Published: 22 August 2014
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2617 | PDF Full-text (999 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the interest of a consolidation process associated with the powder-in-tube technique in order to fabricate a long length of specialty optical fibers. This so-called Modified Powder-in-Tube (MPIT) process is very flexible and paves the way [...] Read more.
The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the interest of a consolidation process associated with the powder-in-tube technique in order to fabricate a long length of specialty optical fibers. This so-called Modified Powder-in-Tube (MPIT) process is very flexible and paves the way to multimaterial optical fiber fabrications with different core and cladding glassy materials. Another feature of this technique lies in the sintering of the preform under reducing or oxidizing atmosphere. The fabrication of such optical fibers implies different constraints that we have to deal with, namely chemical species diffusion or mechanical stress due to the mismatches between thermal expansion coefficients and working temperatures of the fiber materials. This paper focuses on preliminary results obtained with a lanthano-aluminosilicate glass used as the core material for the fabrication of all-glass fibers or specialty Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs). To complete the panel of original microstructures now available by the MPIT technique, we also present several optical fibers in which metallic particles or microwires are included into a silica-based matrix. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Novel Magnetic Graphene Oxide Composite Absorbent for Removing Trace Residues of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Water
Materials 2014, 7(8), 6028-6044; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7086028
Received: 8 May 2014 / Revised: 29 May 2014 / Accepted: 8 August 2014 / Published: 21 August 2014
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2609 | PDF Full-text (1088 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to develop a facile method for the fabrication of a stable and reusable magnetic graphene composite absorbent to remove trace levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water treatment. The poly cationic Fe3O4@PDDA (poly(diallyldimethyl [...] Read more.
The purpose of the study was to develop a facile method for the fabrication of a stable and reusable magnetic graphene composite absorbent to remove trace levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water treatment. The poly cationic Fe3O4@PDDA (poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDDA)) core-shell structured nanoparticles were first synthesized, and then, DNA was laid on the surface of graphene oxide (GOx) to prepare the polyanionic GOx@DNA composite. The above materials were then mixed together and adhered together through sol-gel technology. Thus, the Fe3O4@PDDA/GOx@DNA composite absorbent was prepared. Its performance was tested by disperse solid phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) for removing six kinds of indicative polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) in water samples. The removal percentages of several real samples for six kinds of BDEs (BDE17, BDE28, BDE 71, BDE 47, BDE 66, BDE 100) at the ng/mL order of magnitude were in the range of 88.2%–99.1%. The removal percentage still reached 80.0% when the adsorbent was reused at least 20 times. The results suggested that the magnetic absorbent can obviously remove trace levels of BDEs from large volumes of aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup with high removal efficiency. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Life Cycle Assessment of Completely Recyclable Concrete
Materials 2014, 7(8), 6010-6027; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7086010
Received: 15 June 2014 / Revised: 13 August 2014 / Accepted: 15 August 2014 / Published: 21 August 2014
Cited by 40 | Viewed by 3704 | PDF Full-text (2203 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since the construction sector uses 50% of the Earth’s raw materials and produces 50% of its waste, the development of more durable and sustainable building materials is crucial. Today, Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW) is mainly used in low level applications, namely as [...] Read more.
Since the construction sector uses 50% of the Earth’s raw materials and produces 50% of its waste, the development of more durable and sustainable building materials is crucial. Today, Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW) is mainly used in low level applications, namely as unbound material for foundations, e.g., in road construction. Mineral demolition waste can be recycled as crushed aggregates for concrete, but these reduce the compressive strength and affect the workability due to higher values of water absorption. To advance the use of concrete rubble, Completely Recyclable Concrete (CRC) is designed for reincarnation within the cement production, following the Cradle-to-Cradle (C2C) principle. By the design, CRC becomes a resource for cement production because the chemical composition of CRC will be similar to that of cement raw materials. If CRC is used on a regular basis, a closed concrete-cement-concrete material cycle will arise, which is completely different from the current life cycle of traditional concrete. Within the research towards this CRC it is important to quantify the benefit for the environment and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) needs to be performed, of which the results are presented in a this paper. It was observed that CRC could significantly reduce the global warming potential of concrete. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
High Pressure Pneumatic Forming of Ti-3Al-2.5V Titanium Tubes in a Square Cross-Sectional Die
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5992-6009; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085992
Received: 16 May 2014 / Revised: 31 July 2014 / Accepted: 31 July 2014 / Published: 20 August 2014
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2401 | PDF Full-text (2112 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new high strain rate forming process for titanium alloys is presented and named High Pressure Pneumatic Forming (HPPF), which might be applicable to form certain tubular components with irregular cross sections with high efficiency, both with respect to energy cost and time [...] Read more.
A new high strain rate forming process for titanium alloys is presented and named High Pressure Pneumatic Forming (HPPF), which might be applicable to form certain tubular components with irregular cross sections with high efficiency, both with respect to energy cost and time consumption. HPPF experiments were performed on Ti-3Al-2.5V titanium alloy tubes using a square cross-sectional die with a small corner radius. The effects of forming of pressure and temperature on the corner filling were investigated and the thickness distributions after the HPPF processes at various pressure levels are discussed. At the same time, the stress state, strain and strain rate distribution during the HPPF process were numerically analyzed by the finite element method. Microstructure evolution of the formed tubes was also analyzed by using electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD). Because of different stress states, the strain and strain rate are very different at different areas of the tube during the corner filling process, and consequently the microstructure of the formed component is affected to some degree. The results verified that HPPF is a potential technology to form titanium tubular components with complicated geometrical features with high efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and Their Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Recycling of Coal Fly Ash for the Fabrication of Porous Mullite/Alumina Composites
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5982-5991; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085982
Received: 13 June 2014 / Revised: 11 August 2014 / Accepted: 12 August 2014 / Published: 19 August 2014
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2496 | PDF Full-text (4214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Coal fly ash with the addition of Al2O3 was recycled to produce mullite/alumina composites and the camphene-based freeze casting technique was processed to develop a controlled porous structure with improved mechanical strength. Many rod-shaped mullite crystals, formed by the mullitization [...] Read more.
Coal fly ash with the addition of Al2O3 was recycled to produce mullite/alumina composites and the camphene-based freeze casting technique was processed to develop a controlled porous structure with improved mechanical strength. Many rod-shaped mullite crystals, formed by the mullitization of coal fly ash in the presence of enough silicate, melt. After sintering at 1300–1500 °C with the initial solid loadings of 30–50 wt.%, interconnected macro-sized pore channels with nearly circular-shaped cross-sections developed along the macroscopic solidification direction of camphene solvent used in freeze casting and a few micron-sized pores formed in the walls of the pore channels. The macro-pore size of the mullite/alumina composites was in the range 20–25 μm, 18–20 μm and 15–17 μm with reverse dependence on the sintering temperature at 30, 40 and 50 wt.% solid loading, respectively. By increasing initial solid loading and the sintering temperature, the sintered porosity was reduced from 79.8% to 31.2%, resulting in an increase in the compressive strength from 8.2 to 80.4 MPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Material and Structural Performance Evaluations of Hwangtoh Admixtures and Recycled PET Fiber-Added Eco-Friendly Concrete for CO2 Emission Reduction
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5959-5981; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085959
Received: 22 April 2014 / Revised: 13 August 2014 / Accepted: 14 August 2014 / Published: 19 August 2014
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3305 | PDF Full-text (2234 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and produce an eco-friendly construction material, a type of concrete that uses a minimal amount of cement, yet still retains equivalent properties to ordinary cement concrete, has been developed and studied all over [...] Read more.
In order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and produce an eco-friendly construction material, a type of concrete that uses a minimal amount of cement, yet still retains equivalent properties to ordinary cement concrete, has been developed and studied all over the world. Hwangtoh, a type of red clay broadly deposited around the world, has traditionally been considered an eco-friendly construction material, with bonus advantages of having health and cost benefits. Presently, Hwangtoh is not commonly used as a modern construction material due to properties such as low strength and high rates of shrinkage cracking. Recent studies, however, have shown that Hwangtoh can be used as a mineral admixture to improve the strength of concrete. In addition, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers recycled from PET bottle waste can be used to control shrinkage cracks in Hwangtoh concrete. Therefore, in this study, performance verification is conducted on newly developed Hwangtoh concrete mixed with short recycled PET fibers. The results show that Hwangtoh concrete has compressive strength, elastic modulus, and pH properties that are similar to these features in ordinary cement concrete. The properties of carbonation depth and creep strain of Hwangtoh concrete, however, are larger and smaller, respectively, than in ordinary cement concrete. According to flexural tests, reinforced concrete (RC) specimens cast with Hwangtoh admixtures (with and without PET fibers) possess similar or better capacities than ordinary RC specimens. The addition of PET fibers significantly improves the structural ductility of RC specimens under normal environmental conditions. However, the implementations of the concrete in aggressive environment must be carefully considered, since a previous study result indicates degradation of its durability performance in aggressive environments, such as seawater [1]. The results of this study validate the possibility of using eco-friendly Hwangtoh concrete reinforced with recycled PET fibers as a structural material for modern construction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Experimental Study on the Seismic Performance of Recycled Concrete Brick Walls Embedded with Vertical Reinforcement
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5934-5958; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085934
Received: 11 June 2014 / Revised: 6 August 2014 / Accepted: 6 August 2014 / Published: 19 August 2014
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3230 | PDF Full-text (2958 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recycled concrete brick (RCB) is manufactured by recycled aggregate processed from discarded concrete blocks arising from the demolishing of existing buildings. This paper presents research on the seismic performance of RCB masonry walls to assess the applicability of RCB for use in rural [...] Read more.
Recycled concrete brick (RCB) is manufactured by recycled aggregate processed from discarded concrete blocks arising from the demolishing of existing buildings. This paper presents research on the seismic performance of RCB masonry walls to assess the applicability of RCB for use in rural low-rise constructions. The seismic performance of a masonry wall is closely related to the vertical load applied to the wall. Thus, the compressive performance of RCB masonry was investigated firstly by constructing and testing eighteen RCB masonry compressive specimens with different mortar strengths. The load-bearing capacity, deformation and failure characteristic were analyzed, as well. Then, a quasi-static test was carried out to study the seismic behavior of RCB walls by eight RCB masonry walls subjected to an axial compressive load and a reversed cyclic lateral load. Based on the test results, equations for predicting the compressive strength of RCB masonry and the lateral ultimate strength of an RCB masonry wall were proposed. Experimental values were found to be in good agreement with the predicted values. Meanwhile, finite element analysis (FEA) and parametric analysis of the RCB walls were carried out using ABAQUS software. The elastic-plastic deformation characteristics and the lateral load-displacement relations were studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Structural and Mechanical Characterization of Sustainable Composites Based on Recycled and Stabilized Fly Ash
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5920-5933; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085920
Received: 13 June 2014 / Revised: 3 August 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 18 August 2014
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2281 | PDF Full-text (746 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reports the results on the use of an innovative inert, based on stabilized fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration as a filler for polypropylene. The starting material, which contains large quantities of leachable Pb and Zn, was stabilized by means [...] Read more.
This paper reports the results on the use of an innovative inert, based on stabilized fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration as a filler for polypropylene. The starting material, which contains large quantities of leachable Pb and Zn, was stabilized by means of an innovative process using rice husk ash as a waste silica source, together with other fly ashes, such as coal fly ash and flue gas desulfurization residues. The use of all waste materials to obtain a new filler makes the proposed technology extremely sustainable and competitive. The new composites, obtained by using the stabilized material as a filler for polypropylene, were characterized and their mechanical properties were also investigated. A comparison with a traditional polypropylene and calcium carbonate based compound was also done. This research activity was realized in the frame of the COSMOS-RICE project, financed by the EU Commission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
The Use of Deconstructed Tires as Elastic Elements in Railway Tracks
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5903-5919; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085903
Received: 13 June 2014 / Revised: 29 July 2014 / Accepted: 31 July 2014 / Published: 18 August 2014
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2263 | PDF Full-text (1152 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Elastic elements such as rail pads, under sleeper pads and under ballast mats are railway components that allow for a reduction in track deterioration and vibrations. And they are furthermore commonly used to obtain an optimal vertical stiffness of the infrastructure. However, the [...] Read more.
Elastic elements such as rail pads, under sleeper pads and under ballast mats are railway components that allow for a reduction in track deterioration and vibrations. And they are furthermore commonly used to obtain an optimal vertical stiffness of the infrastructure. However, the use of elastomeric materials can increase construction costs and the consumption of raw materials. Thus, the utilization of used tire layers offers an alternative to reuse an abundant waste reducing the cost of elastic elements. In addition, an innovator technique allows deconstructing tire layers without grinding up the material, reducing production costs at the same time that tire properties are remained. This research is focused on the study of the viability of developing elastic components from used tire layers by evaluating the influence of thickness, the resistance capacity of the elements and their behavior in a ballast box. Results indicate the ability of tire pads to manufacture elastic elements (rail pads, under sleeper pads and under ballast mats) to be used in railway tracks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessReview
Challenges and Alternatives to Plastics Recycling in the Automotive Sector
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5883-5902; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085883
Received: 13 June 2014 / Revised: 5 August 2014 / Accepted: 11 August 2014 / Published: 15 August 2014
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 4963 | PDF Full-text (670 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Plastics are increasingly a preferred material choice in designing and developing complex, consumer products, such as automobiles, because they are mouldable, lightweight, and are often perceived to be highly recyclable materials. However, actually recycling the heterogeneous plastics used in such durable items is [...] Read more.
Plastics are increasingly a preferred material choice in designing and developing complex, consumer products, such as automobiles, because they are mouldable, lightweight, and are often perceived to be highly recyclable materials. However, actually recycling the heterogeneous plastics used in such durable items is challenging, and presents very different scenarios to how simple products, such as water bottles, are recovered via curbside or container recycling initiatives. While the technology exists to recycle plastics, their feasibility to do so from high level consumer or industrial applications is bounded by technological and economical restraints. Obstacles include the lack of market for recyclates, and the lack of cost efficient recovery infrastructures or processes. Furthermore, there is a knowledge gap between manufacturers, consumers, and end-of-life facility operators. For these reasons, end-of-life plastics are more likely to end up down-cycled, or as shredder residue and then landfilled. This paper reviews these challenges and several alternatives to recycling plastics in order to broaden the mindset surrounding plastics recycling to improve their sustainability. The paper focuses on the automotive sector for examples, but discussion can be applied to a wide range of plastic components from similarly complex products. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Mucin and Bicarbonate Ion on Corrosion Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy for Airway Stents
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5866-5882; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085866
Received: 14 June 2014 / Revised: 17 July 2014 / Accepted: 7 August 2014 / Published: 15 August 2014
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3237 | PDF Full-text (5425 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The biodegradable ability of magnesium alloys is an attractive feature for tracheal stents since they can be absorbed by the body through gradual degradation after healing of the airway structure, which can reduce the risk of inflammation caused by long-term implantation and prevent [...] Read more.
The biodegradable ability of magnesium alloys is an attractive feature for tracheal stents since they can be absorbed by the body through gradual degradation after healing of the airway structure, which can reduce the risk of inflammation caused by long-term implantation and prevent the repetitive surgery for removal of existing stent. In this study, the effects of bicarbonate ion (HCO3) and mucin in Gamble’s solution on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated, using immersion and electrochemical tests to systematically identify the biodegradation kinetics of magnesium alloy under in vitro environment, mimicking the epithelial mucus surfaces in a trachea for development of biodegradable airway stents. Analysis of corrosion products after immersion test was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to identify the effects of bicarbonate ions and mucin on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloys with the temporal change of corrosion resistance. The results show that the increase of the bicarbonate ions in Gamble’s solution accelerates the dissolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy, while the addition of mucin retards the corrosion. The experimental data in this work is intended to be used as foundational knowledge to predict the corrosion behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy in the airway environment while providing degradation information for future in vivo studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and Their Applications)
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Open AccessCommunication
One-Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposite Synthesized with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Templates
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5858-5865; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085858
Received: 25 May 2014 / Revised: 30 June 2014 / Accepted: 8 August 2014 / Published: 13 August 2014
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2314 | PDF Full-text (1092 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study reports on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as templates for the preparation of 1D porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites. The in situ deposited SWCNT were sputter coated with Sn metal and thermally oxidized in air to form a SnO2/SWCNT nanowire framework [...] Read more.
This study reports on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as templates for the preparation of 1D porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites. The in situ deposited SWCNT were sputter coated with Sn metal and thermally oxidized in air to form a SnO2/SWCNT nanowire framework on SiO2/Si substrate. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was coated onto this scaffold through UV light-induced radical polymerization, which resulted in the final formation of hybrid composites. The structures of hybrid composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that PAA was successfully coated and the structural advantage of nanowire was fairly maintained, which indicates that this framework is very stable for organic functionalization in solution. The simplicity of this method for the formation of porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites provides a potential application for nanoelectronic devices. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Quality Assessment of Mixed and Ceramic Recycled Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Wastes in the Concrete Manufacture According to the Spanish Standard
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5843-5857; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085843
Received: 18 June 2014 / Revised: 19 July 2014 / Accepted: 7 August 2014 / Published: 13 August 2014
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2280 | PDF Full-text (786 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Construction and demolition waste (CDW) constitutes an increasingly significant problem in society due to the volume generated, rendering sustainable management and disposal problematic. The aim of this study is to identify a possible reuse option in the concrete manufacturing for recycled aggregates with [...] Read more.
Construction and demolition waste (CDW) constitutes an increasingly significant problem in society due to the volume generated, rendering sustainable management and disposal problematic. The aim of this study is to identify a possible reuse option in the concrete manufacturing for recycled aggregates with a significant ceramic content: mixed recycled aggregates (MixRA) and ceramic recycled aggregates (CerRA). In order to do so, several tests are conducted in accordance with the Spanish Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08) to determine the composition in weight and physic-mechanical characteristics (particle size distributions, fine content, sand equivalent, density, water absorption, flakiness index, and resistance to fragmentation) of the samples for the partial inclusion of the recycled aggregates in concrete mixes. The results of these tests clearly support the hypothesis that this type of material may be suitable for such partial replacements if simple pretreatment is carried out. Furthermore, this measure of reuse is in line with European, national, and regional policies on sustainable development, and presents a solution to the environmental problem caused by the generation of CDW. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessReview
Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5816-5842; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085816
Received: 13 May 2014 / Revised: 31 July 2014 / Accepted: 1 August 2014 / Published: 12 August 2014
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3679 | PDF Full-text (1141 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL) materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical [...] Read more.
Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL) materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL) materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs), are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Chloride Permeability of Damaged High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composite by Repeated Compressive Loads
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5802-5815; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085802
Received: 24 June 2014 / Revised: 18 July 2014 / Accepted: 4 August 2014 / Published: 11 August 2014
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2366 | PDF Full-text (621 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The development of cracking in concrete structures leads to significant permeability and to durability problems as a result. Approaches to controlling crack development and crack width in concrete structures have been widely debated. Recently, it was recognized that a high-performance fiber-reinforced cement composite [...] Read more.
The development of cracking in concrete structures leads to significant permeability and to durability problems as a result. Approaches to controlling crack development and crack width in concrete structures have been widely debated. Recently, it was recognized that a high-performance fiber-reinforced cement composite (HPFRCC) provides a possible solution to this inherent problem of cracking by smearing one or several dominant cracks into many distributed microcracks under tensile loading conditions. However, the chloride permeability of HPFRCC under compressive loading conditions is not yet fully understood. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to explore the chloride diffusion characteristics of HPFRCC damaged by compressive loads. The chloride diffusivity of HPFRCC is measured after being subjected to various repeated loads. The results show that the residual axial strain, lateral strain and specific crack area of HPFRCC specimens increase with an increase in the damage induced by repeated loads. However, the chloride diffusion coefficient increases only up to 1.5-times, whereas the specific crack area increases up to 3-times with an increase in damage. Although HPFRCC shows smeared distributed cracks in tensile loads, a significant reduction in the diffusion coefficient of HPFRCC is not obtained compared to plain concrete when the cyclic compressive load is applied below 85% of the strength. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Advanced Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
High Purity and Yield of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Using Amorphous Boron and a Nozzle-Type Reactor
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5789-5801; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085789
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 1 August 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 11 August 2014
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2549 | PDF Full-text (8949 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor [...] Read more.
Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor for BNNTs synthesis, as well as the Fe impurity contained in the B/Fe interdiffused precursor nanoparticles by using a simple purification process. We also explored a nozzle-type reactor that increased the production yield of BNNTs compared to a conventional flow-through reactor. By using a nozzle-type reactor with amorphous boron-based precursor, the weight of the BNNTs sample after annealing was increased as much as 2.5-times with much less impurities compared to the case for the flow-through reactor with the crystalline boron-based precursor. Under the same experimental conditions, the yield and quantity of BNNTs were estimated as much as ~70% and ~1.15 g/batch for the former, while they are ~54% and 0.78 g/batch for the latter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compound Semiconductor Materials 2014)
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Different Recycling Scenarios on the Mechanical Design of an LED Weatherproof Light Fitting
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5769-5788; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085769
Received: 13 June 2014 / Revised: 4 August 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 11 August 2014
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2277 | PDF Full-text (1047 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper analyzes the high relevance of material selection for the sustainable development of an LED weatherproof light fitting. The research reveals how this choice modifies current and future end of life scenarios and can reduce the overall environmental impact. This life cycle [...] Read more.
This paper analyzes the high relevance of material selection for the sustainable development of an LED weatherproof light fitting. The research reveals how this choice modifies current and future end of life scenarios and can reduce the overall environmental impact. This life cycle assessment has been carried out with Ecotool, a software program especially developed for designers to assess the environmental performance of their designs at the same time that they are working on them. Results show that special attention can be put on the recycling and reusing of the product from the initial stages of development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
A Self-Aligned a-IGZO Thin-Film Transistor Using a New Two-Photo-Mask Process with a Continuous Etching Scheme
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5761-5768; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085761
Received: 26 June 2014 / Revised: 24 July 2014 / Accepted: 30 July 2014 / Published: 11 August 2014
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3515 | PDF Full-text (1044 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Minimizing the parasitic capacitance and the number of photo-masks can improve operational speed and reduce fabrication costs. Therefore, in this study, a new two-photo-mask process is proposed that exhibits a self-aligned structure without an etching-stop layer. Combining the backside-ultraviolet (BUV) exposure and backside-lift-off [...] Read more.
Minimizing the parasitic capacitance and the number of photo-masks can improve operational speed and reduce fabrication costs. Therefore, in this study, a new two-photo-mask process is proposed that exhibits a self-aligned structure without an etching-stop layer. Combining the backside-ultraviolet (BUV) exposure and backside-lift-off (BLO) schemes can not only prevent the damage when etching the source/drain (S/D) electrodes but also reduce the number of photo-masks required during fabrication and minimize the parasitic capacitance with the decreasing of gate overlap length at same time. Compared with traditional fabrication processes, the proposed process yields that thin-film transistors (TFTs) exhibit comparable field-effect mobility (9.5 cm2/V·s), threshold voltage (3.39 V), and subthreshold swing (0.3 V/decade). The delay time of an inverter fabricated using the proposed process was considerably decreased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compound Semiconductor Materials 2014)
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Open AccessArticle
A Corrosion Sensor for Monitoring the Early-Stage Environmental Corrosion of A36 Carbon Steel
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5746-5760; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085746
Received: 18 December 2013 / Revised: 1 August 2014 / Accepted: 4 August 2014 / Published: 8 August 2014
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2583 | PDF Full-text (904 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
An innovative prototype sensor containing A36 carbon steel as a capacitor was explored to monitor early-stage corrosion. The sensor detected the changes of the surface- rather than the bulk- property and morphology of A36 during corrosion. Thus it was more sensitive than the [...] Read more.
An innovative prototype sensor containing A36 carbon steel as a capacitor was explored to monitor early-stage corrosion. The sensor detected the changes of the surface- rather than the bulk- property and morphology of A36 during corrosion. Thus it was more sensitive than the conventional electrical resistance corrosion sensors. After being soaked in an aerated 0.2 M NaCl solution, the sensor’s normalized electrical resistance (R/R0) decreased continuously from 1.0 to 0.74 with the extent of corrosion. Meanwhile, the sensor’s normalized capacitance (C/C0) increased continuously from 1.0 to 1.46. X-ray diffraction result indicates that the iron rust on A36 had crystals of lepidocrocite and magnetite. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion of Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Optical Spectra Tuning of All-Glass Photonic Bandgap Fiber Infiltrated with Silver Fast-Ion-Conducting Glasses
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5735-5745; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085735
Received: 2 July 2014 / Revised: 3 August 2014 / Accepted: 4 August 2014 / Published: 7 August 2014
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2645 | PDF Full-text (984 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Silver iodide metaphosphate glasses of the xAgI + (1−x)AgPO3 family are embedded inside the air capillaries of a commercial silica photonic crystal fiber (PCF) by means of vacuum-assisted infiltration technique. In this paper, we report on tuning the photonic [...] Read more.
Silver iodide metaphosphate glasses of the xAgI + (1−x)AgPO3 family are embedded inside the air capillaries of a commercial silica photonic crystal fiber (PCF) by means of vacuum-assisted infiltration technique. In this paper, we report on tuning the photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance characteristics of the fabricated all-glass photonic bandgap fibers, by varying the composition of the fast-ion-conducting phosphate glass infiltration medium. Doping AgPO3 metaphosphate glass with AgI significantly alters the PBG guidance patterns in the examined range between 350 and 1750 nm, as it leads to the introduction of numerous additional transmission stop-bands, while affecting scattering dependant losses. The effect of phosphate glass cooling method during sample fabrication on the transmission behavior of the xAgI + (1−x)AgPO3/PCFs is also considered. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Inhibition of Aluminum Corrosion in Sulfuric Acid by Poly(1-vinyl-3-alkyl-imidazolium Hexafluorophosphate)
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5711-5734; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085711
Received: 8 May 2014 / Revised: 23 July 2014 / Accepted: 29 July 2014 / Published: 7 August 2014
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3476 | PDF Full-text (6926 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Compounds of poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs), derived from imidazole with different alkylic chain lengths located in the third position of the imidazolium ring (poly(1-vinyl-3-dodecyl-imidazolium) (PImC12), poly(1-vinyl-3-octylimidazolium) (PImC8) and poly(1-vinyl-3-butylimidazolium) (PImC4) hexafluorophosphate) were synthesized. These compounds were tested as [...] Read more.
Compounds of poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs), derived from imidazole with different alkylic chain lengths located in the third position of the imidazolium ring (poly(1-vinyl-3-dodecyl-imidazolium) (PImC12), poly(1-vinyl-3-octylimidazolium) (PImC8) and poly(1-vinyl-3-butylimidazolium) (PImC4) hexafluorophosphate) were synthesized. These compounds were tested as corrosion inhibitors on aluminum alloy AA6061 in diluted sulfuric acid (0.1–1 M H2SO4) by weight loss tests, polarization resistance measurements and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Langmuir’s isotherms suggested film formation on bare alloy while standard free energy indicated inhibition by a physisorption process. However, compound efficiencies as inhibitors ranked low (PImC12 > PImC8 > PImC4) to reach 61% for PImC12 in highly diluted acidic solution. Apparently, the high mobility of sulfates favored their adsorption in comparison to PILs. The surface film displayed general corrosion, and pitting occurred as a consequence of PILs’ partial inhibition along with a continuous dissolution of defective patchy film on formation. A slight improvement in efficiency was displayed by compounds having high molecular weight and a long alkyl chain, as a consequence of steric hindrance and PIL interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion of Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
High Power Spark Delivery System Using Hollow Core Kagome Lattice Fibers
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5700-5710; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085700
Received: 20 June 2014 / Revised: 24 July 2014 / Accepted: 30 July 2014 / Published: 7 August 2014
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2922 | PDF Full-text (750 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study examines the use of the recently developed hollow core kagome lattice fibers for delivery of high power laser pulses. Compared to other photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), the hollow core kagome fibers have larger core diameter (~50 µm), which allows for higher [...] Read more.
This study examines the use of the recently developed hollow core kagome lattice fibers for delivery of high power laser pulses. Compared to other photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), the hollow core kagome fibers have larger core diameter (~50 µm), which allows for higher energy coupling in the fiber while also maintaining high beam quality at the output (M2 = 1.25). We have conducted a study of the maximum deliverable energy versus laser pulse duration using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Pulse energies as high as 30 mJ were transmitted for 30 ns pulse durations. This represents, to our knowledge; the highest laser pulse energy delivered using PCFs. Two fiber damage mechanisms were identified as damage at the fiber input and damage within the bulk of the fiber. Finally, we have demonstrated fiber delivered laser ignition on a single-cylinder gasoline direct injection engine. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Acoustic Properties of Water Submerged Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) and Spruce (Picea spp.) Wood and Their Suitability for Use as Musical Instruments
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5688-5699; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085688
Received: 25 September 2013 / Revised: 5 February 2014 / Accepted: 14 July 2014 / Published: 6 August 2014
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2183 | PDF Full-text (373 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wood is a common material used for the manufacture of many products, and submerged wood, in particular, has been used in niche markets and musical instruments. In order to examine if submerged wood in British Columbia, Canada, would be appropriate for use as [...] Read more.
Wood is a common material used for the manufacture of many products, and submerged wood, in particular, has been used in niche markets and musical instruments. In order to examine if submerged wood in British Columbia, Canada, would be appropriate for use as musical instruments, a study was performed in 2007 on submerged wood from Ootsa Lake, British Columbia, Canada. The results of that study showed the wood was not suitable for musical instruments. In this paper, the wood samples were allowed to age untouched in a laboratory setting and were then retested under the hypothesis that physical acoustic characteristics would improve. It was shown, however, that acoustic properties became less adequate after being left to dry over time. This article describes the density, speed of sound, acoustic constant and characteristic impedance properties for submerged wood and a comparison is made for different applications for musical instruments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Spark Plasma Sintering As a Solid-State Recycling Technique: The Case of Aluminum Alloy Scrap Consolidation
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5664-5687; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085664
Received: 26 June 2014 / Revised: 26 July 2014 / Accepted: 29 July 2014 / Published: 6 August 2014
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 3572 | PDF Full-text (1996 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recently, “meltless” recycling techniques have been presented for the light metals category, targeting both energy and material savings by bypassing the final recycling step of remelting. In this context, the use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) is proposed in this paper as a [...] Read more.
Recently, “meltless” recycling techniques have been presented for the light metals category, targeting both energy and material savings by bypassing the final recycling step of remelting. In this context, the use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) is proposed in this paper as a novel solid-state recycling technique. The objective is two-fold: (I) to prove the technical feasibility of this approach; and (II) to characterize the recycled samples. Aluminum (Al) alloy scrap was selected to demonstrate the SPS effectiveness in producing fully-dense samples. For this purpose, Al alloy scrap in the form of machining chips was cold pre-compacted and sintered bellow the solidus temperature at 490 °C, under elevated pressure of 200 MPa. The dynamic scrap compaction, combined with electric current-based joule heating, achieved partial fracture of the stable surface oxides, desorption of the entrapped gases and activated the metallic surfaces, resulting in efficient solid-state chip welding eliminating residual porosity. The microhardness, the texture, the mechanical properties, the microstructure and the density of the recycled specimens have been investigated. An X-ray computed tomography (CT) analysis confirmed the density measurements, revealing a void-less bulk material with homogeneously distributed intermetallic compounds and oxides. The oxide content of the chips incorporated within the recycled material slightly increases its elastic properties. Finally, a thermal distribution simulation of the process in different segments illustrates the improved energy efficiency of this approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Reduction of Photoluminescence Quenching by Deuteration of Ytterbium-Doped Amorphous Carbon-Based Photonic Materials
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5643-5663; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085643
Received: 29 May 2014 / Revised: 21 July 2014 / Accepted: 31 July 2014 / Published: 6 August 2014
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2861 | PDF Full-text (583 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In situ Yb-doped amorphous carbon thin films were grown on Si substrates at low temperatures (<200 °C) by a simple one-step RF-PEMOCVD system as a potential photonic material for direct integration with Si CMOS back end-of-line processing. Room temperature photoluminescence around 1 µm [...] Read more.
In situ Yb-doped amorphous carbon thin films were grown on Si substrates at low temperatures (<200 °C) by a simple one-step RF-PEMOCVD system as a potential photonic material for direct integration with Si CMOS back end-of-line processing. Room temperature photoluminescence around 1 µm was observed via direct incorporation of optically active Yb3+ ions from the selected Yb(fod)3 metal-organic compound. The partially fluorinated Yb(fod)3 compound assists the suppression of photoluminescence quenching by substitution of C–H with C–F bonds. A four-fold enhancement of Yb photoluminescence was demonstrated via deuteration of the a-C host. The substrate temperature greatly influences the relative deposition rate of the plasma dissociated metal-organic species, and hence the concentration of the various elements. Yb and F incorporation are promoted at lower substrate temperatures, and suppressed at higher substrate temperatures. O concentration is slightly elevated at higher substrate temperatures. Photoluminescence was limited by the concentration of Yb within the film, the concentration of Yb ions in the +3 state, and the relative amount of quenching due to the various de-excitation pathways associated with the vibrational modes of the host a-C network. The observed wide full-width-at-half-maximum photoluminescence signal is a result of the variety of local bonding environments due to the a-C matrix, and the bonding of the Yb3+ ions to O and/or F ions as observed in the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Carrier Gas Composition on the Stress of Al2O3 Coatings Prepared by the Aerosol Deposition Method
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5633-5642; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085633
Received: 27 June 2014 / Revised: 29 July 2014 / Accepted: 31 July 2014 / Published: 5 August 2014
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 4245 | PDF Full-text (1359 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Al2O3 films were prepared by the aerosol deposition method at room temperature using different carrier gas compositions. The layers were deposited on alumina substrates and the film stress of the layer was calculated by measuring the deformation of the substrate. [...] Read more.
Al2O3 films were prepared by the aerosol deposition method at room temperature using different carrier gas compositions. The layers were deposited on alumina substrates and the film stress of the layer was calculated by measuring the deformation of the substrate. It was shown that the film stress can be halved by using oxygen instead of nitrogen or helium as the carrier gas. The substrates were annealed at different temperature steps to gain information about the temperature dependence of the reduction of the implemented stress. Total relaxation of the stress can already be achieved at 300 °C. The XRD pattern shows crystallite growth and reduction of microstrain while annealing. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Characterization of Bioplastic-Based Green Renewable Composites from Tapioca with Acetyl Tributyl Citrate as a Plasticizer
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5617-5632; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085617
Received: 9 June 2014 / Revised: 25 July 2014 / Accepted: 29 July 2014 / Published: 4 August 2014
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 3342 | PDF Full-text (1227 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Granular tapioca was thermally blended with poly(lactic acid) (PLA). All blends were prepared using a plasti-corder and characterized for tensile properties, thermal properties and morphology. Scanning electron micrographs showed that phase separation occurred, leading to poor tensile properties. Therefore, methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was [...] Read more.
Granular tapioca was thermally blended with poly(lactic acid) (PLA). All blends were prepared using a plasti-corder and characterized for tensile properties, thermal properties and morphology. Scanning electron micrographs showed that phase separation occurred, leading to poor tensile properties. Therefore, methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was used as an interfacial compatibilizer to improve the mechanical properties of PLA/tapioca blends. The addition of MDI could improve the tensile strength of the blend with 60 wt% tapioca, from 19.8 to 42.6 MPa. In addition, because PLA lacked toughness, acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC) was added as a plasticizer to improve the ductility of PLA. A significant decrease in the melting point and glass-transition temperature was observed on the basis of differential scanning calorimetry, which indicated that the PLA structure was not dense after ATBC was added. As such, the brittleness was improved, and the elongation at break was extended to several hundred percent. Therefore, mixing ATBC with PLA/tapioca/MDI blends did exhibit the effect of plasticization and biodegradation. The results also revealed that excessive plasticizer would cause the migration of ATBC and decrease the tensile properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Recycling of Clay Sediments for Geopolymer Binder Production. A New Perspective for Reservoir Management in the Framework of Italian Legislation: The Occhito Reservoir Case Study
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5603-5616; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma7085603
Received: 14 June 2014 / Revised: 9 July 2014 / Accepted: 21 July 2014 / Published: 31 July 2014
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 2564 | PDF Full-text (1094 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Reservoir silting is an unavoidable issue. It is estimated that in Italy, the potential rate of silting-up in large reservoirs ranges from 0.1% to 1% in the presence of wooded river basins and intensive agricultural land use, respectively. In medium and small-sized reservoirs, [...] Read more.
Reservoir silting is an unavoidable issue. It is estimated that in Italy, the potential rate of silting-up in large reservoirs ranges from 0.1% to 1% in the presence of wooded river basins and intensive agricultural land use, respectively. In medium and small-sized reservoirs, these values vary between 0.3% and 2%. Considering both the types of reservoirs, the annual average loss of storage capacity would be of about 1.59%. In this paper, a management strategy aimed at sediment productive reuse is presented. Particularly, the main engineering outcomes of an extensive experimental program on geopolymer binder synthesis is reported. The case study deals with Occhito reservoir, located in Southern Italy. Clay sediments coming from this silted-up artificial lake were characterized, calcined and activated, by means of a wide set of alkaline activating solutions. The results showed the feasibility of this recovery process, optimizing a few chemical parameters. The possible reuse in building material production (binders, precast concrete, bricks, etc.) represents a relevant sustainable alternative to landfill and other more consolidated practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Materials)
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