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Article

Considering the Subjective Well-Being of Israeli Jews during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Messaging Insights from Religiosity and Spirituality as Coping Mechanisms

1
Temerlin Advertising Institute, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205, USA
2
The Moskowitz School of Communication, Ariel University, Ariel 40700, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12010; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912010
Received: 24 August 2022 / Revised: 19 September 2022 / Accepted: 21 September 2022 / Published: 22 September 2022
Consistent with Terror Management Theory (TMT), COVID-19 has made us question our mortality and past studies have indicated the importance of religiosity to enhance subjective well-being (SWB), however, studies on spirituality’s impact are incomplete. The pandemic has created an environment where both religiosity and spirituality may play a vital role. Israel was selected due to the emergence of Jewish spirituality, a phenomenon that is growing in importance but understudied. In response to these caveats, the current study examines the mediating role played by spirituality on the SWB of the religious during the pandemic. Participants from Israel (n = 138) were recruited via Qualtrics’ online panels. Findings showed Jews’ religiosity was important to enhance their SWB, i.e., religious beliefs bring certainty and happiness to one’s life, especially, during the COVID-19 pandemic. More importantly, spirituality mediated the effect of religiosity on SWB, specifically, spirituality was important to enhance the well-being of low religious Jews. Implications for health messaging during a global pandemic are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: religiosity; spirituality; subjective well-being; terror management theory; health messaging; COVID-19; Jewish; Israel; brief report religiosity; spirituality; subjective well-being; terror management theory; health messaging; COVID-19; Jewish; Israel; brief report
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MDPI and ACS Style

Muralidharan, S.; Roth-Cohen, O.; LaFerle, C. Considering the Subjective Well-Being of Israeli Jews during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Messaging Insights from Religiosity and Spirituality as Coping Mechanisms. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 12010. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912010

AMA Style

Muralidharan S, Roth-Cohen O, LaFerle C. Considering the Subjective Well-Being of Israeli Jews during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Messaging Insights from Religiosity and Spirituality as Coping Mechanisms. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(19):12010. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912010

Chicago/Turabian Style

Muralidharan, Sidharth, Osnat Roth-Cohen, and Carrie LaFerle. 2022. "Considering the Subjective Well-Being of Israeli Jews during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Messaging Insights from Religiosity and Spirituality as Coping Mechanisms" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 19: 12010. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912010

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