Next Article in Journal
Effects of a Clinically Indicated Peripheral Intravenous Replacement on Indwelling Time and Complications of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters in Pediatric Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Next Article in Special Issue
Damage to the Testicular Structure of Rats by Acute Oral Exposure of Cadmium
Previous Article in Journal
Regulation/Non-Regulation/Dys-Regulation of Health Behavior, Psychological Reactance, and Health of University Undergraduate Students
Review

Perfluoroalkyl Chemicals and Male Reproductive Health: Do PFOA and PFOS Increase Risk for Male Infertility?

by 1,2,3,* and 1,2
1
Department of Environmental and Public Health Sciences, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
2
Center of Environmental Genetics, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
3
Cincinnati Cancer Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Woo-Sung Kwon
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3794; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073794
Received: 30 December 2020 / Revised: 18 March 2021 / Accepted: 23 March 2021 / Published: 5 April 2021
Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are manmade synthetic chemicals which have been in existence for over 70 years. Though they are currently being phased out, their persistence in the environment is widespread. There is increasing evidence linking PFAS exposure to health effects, an issue of concern since PFAS such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) bioaccumulate in humans, with a half-life of years. Many epidemiological studies suggest that, worldwide, semen quality has decreased over the past several decades. One of the most worrying effects of PFOS and PFOA is their associations with lower testosterone levels, similar to clinical observations in infertile men. This review thus focuses on PFOS/PFOA-associated effects on male reproductive health. The sources of PFAS in drinking water are listed. The current epidemiological studies linking increased exposure to PFAS with lowered testosterone and semen quality, and evidence from rodent studies supporting their function as endocrine disruptors on the reproductive system, exhibiting non-monotonic dose responses, are noted. Finally, their mechanisms of action and possible toxic effects on the Leydig, Sertoli, and germ cells are discussed. Future research efforts must consider utilizing better human model systems for exposure, using more accurate PFAS exposure susceptibility windows, and improvements in statistical modeling of data to account for the endocrine disruptor properties of PFAS. View Full-Text
Keywords: PFOA; PFOS; perfluorooctanoate; perfluorooctane sulfonate; testosterone; spermatogenesis; sperm; mice; rats; epidemiological PFOA; PFOS; perfluorooctanoate; perfluorooctane sulfonate; testosterone; spermatogenesis; sperm; mice; rats; epidemiological
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tarapore, P.; Ouyang, B. Perfluoroalkyl Chemicals and Male Reproductive Health: Do PFOA and PFOS Increase Risk for Male Infertility? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3794. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073794

AMA Style

Tarapore P, Ouyang B. Perfluoroalkyl Chemicals and Male Reproductive Health: Do PFOA and PFOS Increase Risk for Male Infertility? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(7):3794. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073794

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tarapore, Pheruza, and Bin Ouyang. 2021. "Perfluoroalkyl Chemicals and Male Reproductive Health: Do PFOA and PFOS Increase Risk for Male Infertility?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 7: 3794. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073794

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop