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Are Mutations in the DHRS9 Gene Causally Linked to Epilepsy? A Case Report
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Electroencephalographic Abnormalities in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Characteristics and Therapeutic Implications

1
Epilepsy and EEG lab for Developmental Age; Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 80138 Napoli, Italy
2
Inter-University Group for Study and Research on Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Children and Adolescents
3
Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, 90127 Palermo, Italy
4
Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother and Child Care “G. D’Alessandro”, University of Palermo, 90127 Palermo, Italy
5
Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
6
Centro Pro Juventute Minerva SRL, 80131 Napoli, Italy
7
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, 71122 Foggia, Italy
8
Department of Medical and Surgical Science, University “Magna Graecia”, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors equally contributed to the manuscript.
Medicina 2020, 56(9), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56090419
Received: 3 July 2020 / Revised: 16 August 2020 / Accepted: 17 August 2020 / Published: 19 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Neurodevelopmental Disorders)
A large body of literature reports the higher prevalence of epilepsy in subjects with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) compared to the general population. Similarly, several studies report an increased rate of Subclinical Electroencephalographic Abnormalities (SEAs) in seizure-free patients with ASD rather than healthy controls, although with varying percentages. SEAs include both several epileptiform discharges and different non-epileptiform electroencephalographic abnormalities. They are more frequently associated with lower intellectual functioning, more serious dysfunctional behaviors, and they are often sign of severer forms of autism. However, SEAs clinical implications remain controversial, and they could represent an epiphenomenon of the neurochemical alterations of autism etiology. This paper provides an overview of the major research findings with two main purposes: to better delineate the state-of-the-art about EEG abnormalities in ASD and to find evidence for or against appropriateness of SEAs pharmacological treatment in ASD. View Full-Text
Keywords: autism spectrum disorders; epilepsy; electroencephalogram; epileptogenic abnormalities; non-epileptiform abnormalities autism spectrum disorders; epilepsy; electroencephalogram; epileptogenic abnormalities; non-epileptiform abnormalities
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Precenzano, F.; Parisi, L.; Lanzara, V.; Vetri, L.; Operto, F.F.; Pastorino, G.M.G.; Ruberto, M.; Messina, G.; Risoleo, M.C.; Santoro, C.; Bitetti, I.; Marotta, R. Electroencephalographic Abnormalities in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Characteristics and Therapeutic Implications. Medicina 2020, 56, 419.

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