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Open AccessArticle

Fracture Resistance of New Metal-Free Materials Used for CAD-CAM Fabrication of Partial Posterior Restorations

1
Prosthodontics and Occlusion Unit, Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Valencia, 46021 Valencia, Spain
2
Co-director of Master’s Program in Endodontics, Restorative Dentistry, and Dental Esthetics, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2020, 56(3), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56030132
Received: 22 February 2020 / Revised: 14 March 2020 / Accepted: 16 March 2020 / Published: 18 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Dentistry)
Background and Objectives: To evaluate in vitro the fracture resistance and fracture type of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) materials. Materials and Methods: Discs were fabricated (10 × 1.5 mm) from four test groups (N = 80; N = 20 per group): lithium disilicate (LDS) group (control group): IPS e.max CAD®; zirconium-reinforced lithium silicate (ZRLS) group: VITA SUPRINITY®; polymer-infiltrated ceramic networks (PICN) group: VITA ENAMIC®; resin nanoceramics (RNC) group: LAVA™ ULTIMATE. Each disc was cemented (following the manufacturers’ instructions) onto previously prepared molar dentin. Samples underwent until fracture using a Shimadzu® test machine. The stress suffered by each material was calculated with the Hertzian model, and its behavior was analyzed using the Weibull modulus. Data were analyzed with ANOVA parametric statistical tests. Results: The LDS group obtained higher fracture resistance (4588.6 MPa), followed by the ZRLS group (4476.3 MPa) and PICN group (4014.2 MPa) without statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). Hybrid materials presented lower strength than ceramic materials, the RNC group obtaining the lowest values (3110 MPa) with significant difference (p < 0.001). Groups PICN and RNC showed greater occlusal wear on the restoration surface prior to star-shaped fracture on the surface, while other materials presented radial fracture patterns. Conclusion: The strength of CAD-CAM materials depended on their composition, lithium disilicate being stronger than hybrid materials. View Full-Text
Keywords: fracture resistance; resin nanoceramic; polymer-infiltrated ceramic network; lithium disilicate; zirconium-reinforced lithium silicate fracture resistance; resin nanoceramic; polymer-infiltrated ceramic network; lithium disilicate; zirconium-reinforced lithium silicate
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García-Engra, G.; Fernandez-Estevan, L.; Casas-Terrón, J.; Fons-Font, A.; Castelo-Baz, P.; Agustín-Panadero, R.; Román-Rodriguez, J.L. Fracture Resistance of New Metal-Free Materials Used for CAD-CAM Fabrication of Partial Posterior Restorations. Medicina 2020, 56, 132.

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