Next Article in Journal
MiRNA-Based Inspired Approach in Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer
Previous Article in Journal
Comparison of a Five-Year Survival and Cancer Recurrence between Laparoscopically Assisted and Open Colonic Resections due to Adenocarcinoma—A Single Centre Experience
Open AccessArticle

Could the Age Difference of a Single Calendar Year between Patients Undergoing IVF at 34, 35 or at 36 Years Old Affect the IVF Outcome? A Retrospective Data Analysis

1
Centre for Human Reproduction, Genesis Athens Clinic, 14–16, Papanikoli, 15232 Athens, Greece
2
Department of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 75, Mikras Asias, 11527 Athens, Greece
3
Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aretaieion Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 76, Vasilisis Sofias Avenue, 11528 Athens, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Those authors contributed equally.
Medicina 2020, 56(2), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56020092
Received: 27 January 2020 / Revised: 19 February 2020 / Accepted: 20 February 2020 / Published: 24 February 2020
Background and Objectives: Clinicians are called to overcome age-related challenges in decision making during In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible impact of a single calendar year difference among patients aged 34, 35 and 36 on IVF outcomes. Materials and Methods: Medical records between 2008 and 2019 were analyzed retrospectively. The study group consisted of women diagnosed with tubal factor infertility. Sample size was divided in three categories at 34, 35 and 36 years of age. Embryo transfer including two blastocysts was performed for every patient. Comparisons were performed regarding hormonal profile, response to stimulation, quality of transferred embryos, positive hCG test and clinical pregnancy rate. Results: A total of 706 women were eligible to participate. Two-hundred and forty-eight women were 34, 226 were 35 while the remaining 232 were 36 years old. Regarding the hormonal profile, the number of accumulated oocytes and the quality of embryos transferred, no statistically significant difference was documented between the three age groups. Women aged 34 and 35 years old indicated a significantly increased positive hCG rate in comparison to women aged 36 years old (p-value = 0.009, p-value = 0.023, respectively). Women aged 34 and 35 years old presented with a higher clinical pregnancy rate in comparison to those aged 36 years old (p-value = 0.04, p-value = 0.05, respectively). Conclusion: A calendar year difference between patients undergoing IVF treatment at 34 or 35 years of age does not appear to exert any influence regarding outcome. When treatment involves patients above the age of 35, then a single calendar year may exert considerable impact on IVF outcome. This observation indicates that age 35 may serve as a valid cut-off point regarding IVF outcome. View Full-Text
Keywords: assisted reproduction; infertility; in vitro fertilization; maternal age; age 35; IVF success assisted reproduction; infertility; in vitro fertilization; maternal age; age 35; IVF success
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Pantos, K.; Sfakianoudis, K.; Grigoriadis, S.; Maziotis, E.; Tsioulou, P.; Rapani, A.; Giannelou, P.; Atzampos, A.; Koulouraki, S.; Koutsilieris, M.; Vlahos, N.; Mastorakos, G.; Simopoulou, M. Could the Age Difference of a Single Calendar Year between Patients Undergoing IVF at 34, 35 or at 36 Years Old Affect the IVF Outcome? A Retrospective Data Analysis. Medicina 2020, 56, 92.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop