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Irritable Bowel Syndrome between Molecular Approach and Clinical Expertise—Searching for Gap Fillers in the Oxidative Stress Way of Thinking

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Department of Interdisciplinary Research in Science, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Carol I Avenue, No. 11, 700506 Iasi, Romania
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Department of Biology, Faculty of Biology, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Carol I Avenue, 20A, 700506 Iasi, Romania
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Department of Research, Faculty of Biology, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Carol I Avenue, 20A, 700506 Iasi, Romania
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Center of Biomedical Research, Romanian Academy, 8th Carol I Avenue, 700506 Iasi, Romania
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Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, “Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 16th University Street, 700115 Iasi, Romania
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2020, 56(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56010038
Received: 28 December 2019 / Revised: 15 January 2020 / Accepted: 15 January 2020 / Published: 19 January 2020
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains to date an intriguing functional gastrointestinal disorder. Recent studies described a multitude of exogenous factors that work together in IBS, gradually impairing intestinal lining cellular metabolism, including oxidative status balance, with or without a genetic background. Although the current biomarkers support the differentiation between IBS subtypes and other functional gastrointestinal disorder, they are mostly non-specific, referring to clinical, biochemical, and inflammatory imbalances. Since IBS could be also the result of deficient signaling pathways involving both gastrointestinal secretion and neuro-vegetative stimulation, IBS makes no exception from the oxidative hypothesis in the pathological mechanisms. Regarding the oxidative stress implication in IBS, the previous research efforts showed controversial results, with some animal models and patient studies reporting clear oxidative imbalance both on systemic and local levels, but still with no concrete evidence to point to a direct correlation between oxidative stress and IBS. Additionally, it seems that a major role could be also attributed to gut microbiota and their ability to shape our bodies and behaviors. Moreover, the genetic features study in IBS patients showed that several genetic similarities point to a possible correlation of IBS with affective spectrum disorders. Thus, we focus here the discussion on the assumption that IBS could in fact be more likely a stress-related disorder rather than a gastrointestinal one. View Full-Text
Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome; oxidative stress; inflammatory status; predisposition genes; animal models irritable bowel syndrome; oxidative stress; inflammatory status; predisposition genes; animal models
MDPI and ACS Style

Balmus, I.-M.; Ilie-Dumitru, O.; Ciobica, A.; Cojocariu, R.-O.; Stanciu, C.; Trifan, A.; Cimpeanu, M.; Cimpeanu, C.; Gorgan, L. Irritable Bowel Syndrome between Molecular Approach and Clinical Expertise—Searching for Gap Fillers in the Oxidative Stress Way of Thinking. Medicina 2020, 56, 38.

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