Next Article in Journal
The Administration of the New Pyrimidine Derivative—4-{2-[2-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-Vinyl]-6-Ethyl-4-Oxo-5-Phenyl-4H-Pyrimidine-1-Il}Benzsulfamide Restores the Activity of Brain Cells in Experimental Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy by Maintaining Mitochondrial Function
Previous Article in Journal
Key Molecular Events in Cervical Cancer Development
Open AccessArticle

Impact of Depression in Sickle Cell Disease Hospitalization-Related Outcomes: An Analysis of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS)

1
Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Psychiatry, Maastricht University, 4–6, 6211 LK Maastricht, The Netherlands
3
Department of Medicine, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas, Houston, TX 77021, USA
5
Tirunelveli Medical College, Tirunelveli 627011, India
6
Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Kadapa 516002, India
7
Department of Psychiatry, Griffin Memorial Hospital, Norman, OK 73071, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2019, 55(7), 385; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55070385
Received: 29 May 2019 / Revised: 5 July 2019 / Accepted: 9 July 2019 / Published: 17 July 2019
Background and objectives: This study aimed to analyze and discern the differences in demographics and inpatient outcomes (length of stay (LOS), total charges, disease severity, and mortality) between depressed versus non-depressed sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2010–2014). We identified 73,225 SCD hospitalizations and comorbid depression (6317, 8.6%) as the primary and the other diagnosis, respectively, using International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes. We used linear and logistic regression model to evaluate the changes in inpatient outcomes. Results: Comorbid depression was more prevalent among middle-aged adults (11.5%), females (10.63%), and whites (12.43%). We did not find any association between income and comorbid depression among SCD patients. After adjusting for the demographic covariates, comorbid depression remained a significant risk factor for longer LOS (mean difference −1.16 days, 95% CI −1.30 to −1.03) and higher total charges (mean difference −USD5058, 95% CI −6261 to −3855) during hospitalization. SCD with comorbid depression was also significantly associated with a higher number of chronic conditions (mean difference −2.08, 95% CI −2.13 to −2.03) and 1.5 times (95% CI 1.39 to 1.63) higher odds of major severity of illness. Conclusion: Comorbid depression was significantly associated with longer LOS, more severity of illness, and higher hospital charges. Healthcare providers caring for adults with SCD should consider screening for and treating comorbid depression to improve the health-related quality of life. View Full-Text
Keywords: sickle cell disease; depression; hospitalization outcomes; demographics; morbidity; mortality sickle cell disease; depression; hospitalization outcomes; demographics; morbidity; mortality
MDPI and ACS Style

Onyeaka, H.K.; Queeneth, U.; Rashid, W.; Ahmad, N.; Kuduva Rajan, S.; Jaladi, P.R.; Patel, R.S. Impact of Depression in Sickle Cell Disease Hospitalization-Related Outcomes: An Analysis of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS). Medicina 2019, 55, 385.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop