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Open AccessArticle

Retrospective Study on the Clinical Superiority of the Vacuum-Assisted Closure System with a Silicon-Based Dressing over the Conventional Tie-over Bolster Technique in Skin Graft Fixation

1
School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
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Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
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Department of Anesthesiology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
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Department of Anesthesiology, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
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Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
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Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
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Regeneration Medicine and Cell Therapy Research Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2019, 55(12), 781; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55120781
Received: 29 November 2019 / Revised: 10 December 2019 / Accepted: 11 December 2019 / Published: 12 December 2019
Background and Objectives: The tie-over bolster technique has been conventionally used for skin graft fixation; however, long operative times and postoperative pain are the main disadvantages of this method. In this study, we introduce a new method using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) with a silicon-based dressing as an alternative for skin graft fixation. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the clinical effect of the VAC plus silicon-based dressing method and the conventional tie-over bolster technique for skin graft fixation in terms of pain, operative time, and skin graft take rate. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients who underwent skin graft surgery performed by a single surgeon from January 2017 to October 2018 were included in this clinical study. They were divided into two groups based on the type of treatment: tie-over bolster technique and vacuum-assisted closure (VAC), or silicon-based dressing groups. The operative times were recorded twice (during suturing or stapling of the graft and during removal of the dressing) in the two groups; similarly, pain was assessed using a numeric rating scale (NRS) after surgery and during dressing removal. Skin graft take rate was evaluated two weeks after dressing removal. Results: Twenty-six patients who met the eligibility criteria were enrolled into the study and assigned to one of the two groups (n = 13 each). No significant differences in age, gender, and graft area were noted between the two groups of patients. The VAC plus silicon-based dressing group demonstrated higher skin graft take rates (p < 0.05), shorter operation times (p < 0.05), and lower levels of pain (postoperative pain and pain during dressing removal) compared with the tie-over bolster technique group (p < 0.05). Conclusions: These findings indicate that VAC with silicon-based dressing can be used for skin graft fixation due to its superior properties when compared with the conventional method, and can improve the quality of life of patients undergoing skin graft fixation. View Full-Text
Keywords: VAC; silicon-based dressing; pain; skin graft VAC; silicon-based dressing; pain; skin graft
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Chou, P.-R.; Wu, S.-H.; Hsieh, M.-C.; Huang, S.-H. Retrospective Study on the Clinical Superiority of the Vacuum-Assisted Closure System with a Silicon-Based Dressing over the Conventional Tie-over Bolster Technique in Skin Graft Fixation. Medicina 2019, 55, 781.

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