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Open AccessArticle

Contributions of the Left and the Right Hemispheres on Language-Induced Grip Force Modulation of the Left Hand in Unimanual Tasks

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Faculté des Sciences, Université du Québec à Montréal - 141 Avenue du Président-Kennedy, Montréal, QC H2X 1Y4, Canada
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Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation (CRIR), Institut universitaire sur la réadaptation en déficience physique de Montréal (IURDPM) - 6300 Avenue de Darlington, Montréal, QC H3S 2J4, Canada
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Centro Estadual de Reabilitação e de Readaptação Dr Henrique Santillo – CRER - Av. Ver. José Monteiro, 1655 - Setor Negrão de Lima, Goiânia, GO 74653-230, Brazil
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Laboratory of Physical Therapy and Behaviour, Department of Physical Therapy, Speech and Occupational Therapy, University of São Paulo Medical School - Rua Cipotânea, 51 - Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP 05360-000, Brazil
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École de Réadaptation, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal - 7077 Avenue du Parc, Montréal, QC H3N, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2019, 55(10), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55100674
Received: 19 June 2019 / Revised: 30 September 2019 / Accepted: 3 October 2019 / Published: 6 October 2019
Background and Objectives: Language-induced grip force modulation (LGFM) can be used to better understand the link between language and motor functions as an expression of embodied language. However, the contribution of each brain hemisphere to LGFM is still unclear. Using six different action verbs as stimuli, this study evaluated the grip force modulation of the left hand in a unimanual task to characterize the left and right hemispheres’ contributions. Materials and Methods: Left-hand LGFM of 20 healthy and consistently right-handed subjects was evaluated using the verbs “to write”, “to hold”, “to pull” (left-lateralized central processing actions), “to draw”, “to tie”, and “to drive” (bihemispheric central processing actions) as linguistic stimuli. The time between the word onset and the first interval of statistical significance regarding the baseline (here as reaction time, RT) was also measured. Results: The six verbs produced LGFM. The modulation intensity was similar for the six verbs, but the RT was variable. The verbs “to draw”, “to tie”, and “to drive”, whose central processing of the described action is bihemispheric, showed a longer RT compared to the other verbs. Conclusions: The possibility of a given manual action being performed by the left hand in consistent right-handers does not interfere with the occurrence of LGFM when the descriptor verb of this action is used as a linguistic stimulus, even if the possibility is remote. Therefore, LGFM seems to mainly rely on the left hemisphere, while a greater activation of the right hemisphere in action processing appears to slow the increase in LGFM intensity. View Full-Text
Keywords: grip force modulation; embodied language; left hand; right hemisphere; left hemisphere; unimanual task grip force modulation; embodied language; left hand; right hemisphere; left hemisphere; unimanual task
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MDPI and ACS Style

da Silva, R.L.; Santos, F.F.; Mendes, I.M.G.; Caromano, F.A.; Higgins, J.; Frak, V. Contributions of the Left and the Right Hemispheres on Language-Induced Grip Force Modulation of the Left Hand in Unimanual Tasks. Medicina 2019, 55, 674.

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