Next Article in Journal
Metastatic Lymph Node Ratio (mLNR) is a Useful Parameter in the Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer; A Meta-Analysis for the Prognostic Role of mLNR
Previous Article in Journal
Anthropometrical and Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis Parameters in Anorexia Nervosa Patients’ Nutritional Status Assessment
Open AccessReview

Infectious Complications Following Kidney Transplantation—A Focus on Hepatitis C Infection, Cytomegalovirus Infection and Novel Developments in the Gut Microbiota

1
Department of Nephrology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia
2
Australasian Kidney Trials Network, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia
3
Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia
4
Centre for Applied Health Economics, Menzies Research Institute, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia
5
The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Woolloongabba, QLD 4102, Australia
6
Infection Management Services, Department of Microbiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2019, 55(10), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55100672
Received: 15 July 2019 / Revised: 24 September 2019 / Accepted: 30 September 2019 / Published: 4 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infections in Kidney Transplantation)
The incidence of infectious complications, compared with the general population and the pre-transplant status of the recipient, increases substantially following kidney transplantation, causing significant morbidity and mortality. The potent immunosuppressive therapy given to prevent graft rejection in kidney transplant recipients results in an increased susceptibility to a wide range of opportunistic infections including bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Over the last five years, several advances have occurred that may have changed the burden of infectious complications in kidney transplant recipients. Due to the availability of direct-acting antivirals to manage donor-derived hepatitis C infection, this has opened the way for donors with hepatitis C infection to be considered in the donation process. In addition, there have been the development of medications targeting the growing burden of resistant cytomegalovirus, as well as the discovery of the potentially important role of the gastrointestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of post-transplant infection. In this narrative review, we will discuss these three advances and their potential implications for clinical practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: cytomegalovirus; direct acting antivirals; donor-derived infections; gastrointestinal microbiome; hepatitis C; knowledge acquisition; letermovir; kidney transplantation cytomegalovirus; direct acting antivirals; donor-derived infections; gastrointestinal microbiome; hepatitis C; knowledge acquisition; letermovir; kidney transplantation
MDPI and ACS Style

Chan, S.; Isbel, N.M.; Hawley, C.M.; Campbell, S.B.; Campbell, K.L.; Morrison, M.; Francis, R.S.; Playford, E.G.; Johnson, D.W. Infectious Complications Following Kidney Transplantation—A Focus on Hepatitis C Infection, Cytomegalovirus Infection and Novel Developments in the Gut Microbiota. Medicina 2019, 55, 672.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop