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Open AccessArticle

Association between Physical and Motor Fitness with Cognition in Children

1
Islamic Azad University Science and Research Branch, Tehran 1477893855, Iran
2
Department of Counseling, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil 5619911367, Iran
3
Department of Psychology, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil 5619911367, Iran
4
University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil 5619911367, Iran
5
Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland
6
School of Health and Social Care, Teesside University, Middlesbrough TS1 3BA, UK
7
Human Movement Sciences and Rehabilitation Graduation Program, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo 11030-020, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2019, 55(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55010007
Received: 7 November 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 26 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
Background and objective: There is an increased interest in exploring the association between fitness components with cognitive development in children in recent years. One of the scopes is to find the best exercise prescription to enhance health and cognition. Most of the studies so far have focused on cardiorespiratory fitness with little evidence on other fitness components. The present study aimed to explore the association between physical fitness (PF) and motor fitness (MF) with cognitive performance in children. Methods: Two hundred and six schoolboys (11.0 ± 0.8 y) underwent a battery of tests to measure information processing speed (i.e., simple and choice reaction time) and inhibitory control (i.e., Simon task). PF components (i.e., flexibility, muscular strength, and endurance) and MF components (speed and agility) were measured. Results: Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders (i.e., age, socioeconomic status, %fat and physical activity) revealed no relationship between flexibility, speed, muscular strength, and endurance with either information processing tasks or inhibitory control tasks. However, a positive association was observed between agility with both congruent reaction time and incongruent reaction time. Conclusions: No relationship was observed between the underlying fitness components with either information processing or inhibitory control. However, an association was observed between agility with inhibitory control. View Full-Text
Keywords: agility; cognition; fitness; inhibitory control; reaction time; schoolboys agility; cognition; fitness; inhibitory control; reaction time; schoolboys
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Moradi, A.; Sadri Damirchi, E.; Narimani, M.; Esmaeilzadeh, S.; Dziembowska, I.; Azevedo, L.B.; Luiz do Prado, W. Association between Physical and Motor Fitness with Cognition in Children. Medicina 2019, 55, 7.

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