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Medicina 2018, 54(6), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina54060105 (registering DOI)

Effects of Maternal Decisional Authority and Media Use on Vaccination for Children in Asian Countries

1
BK21Plus Program in Embodiment: Health-Society Interaction, Department of Public Health Sciences, Graduate School of Korea University, Seoul 02841, Korea
2
Department of Public Health, Environments and Society, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London WC1H 9SH, UK
3
Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02115, MA, USA
4
Department of Health Science, Dongduk Women’s University, Seoul 136-714, Korea
5
Center for Community-Based Research, Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, Boston 02215, MA, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 October 2018 / Revised: 30 November 2018 / Accepted: 3 December 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promoting Vaccine Acceptance)
Full-Text   |   PDF [253 KB, uploaded 7 December 2018]

Abstract

Background and objectives: It is now accepted that vaccination is a critical public health strategy in preventing child morbidity and mortality. Understanding factors that promote vaccination is a critical first step. The objective of this study was to investigated associations of maternal decisional authority and media use on vaccination for children in six South and Southeast Asian countries. Materials and Methods: Data come from demographic and health surveys conducted in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Nepal, Pakistan, and the Philippines between 2011 and 2014 (N = 45,168 women). Main outcome variables were four types of basic vaccination for children. Independent variables were maternal decisional authority and media use. Hierarchical multivariable regression analyses were performed to examine associations. Results: Children of mothers who had more decisional authority were more likely to be vaccinated compared to those participants who did not have such authority. The likelihood to have their children vaccinated was higher among women who frequently used media than those who did not use media. Conclusions: Maternal decisional authority and media use are related to improved vaccination for children. To increase vaccination rates in developing countries in South and Southeast Asia, programs and policies that promote maternal decisional authority and the use of media for health need to be implemented to help families and local communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: vaccination; women’s decisional authority; media use; health communication; Southeast Asia; South Asia vaccination; women’s decisional authority; media use; health communication; Southeast Asia; South Asia
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Sohn, M.; Lin, L.; Jung, M. Effects of Maternal Decisional Authority and Media Use on Vaccination for Children in Asian Countries. Medicina 2018, 54, 105.

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