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Medicina is published by MDPI from Volume 54 Issue 1 (2018). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Lithuanian Medical Association, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and Vilnius University.
Open AccessArticle

Maternal obesity and obstetric outcomes in a tertiary referral center

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
2
Department of Surgery, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
3
Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2017, 53(2), 109-113; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medici.2017.03.003
Received: 4 April 2016 / Revised: 28 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 19 April 2017
Background and aim: Obese women are at an increased risk of various adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of obesity on maternal and neonatal outcomes in a tertiary referral center and to compare obstetric outcomes by the level of maternal obesity.Materials and methods: A cohort study included 3247 women with singleton gestations who gave birth at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, in 2010. Pregnancy complications and neonatal outcomes were identified using the hospital Birth Registry database in normal weight (body mass index [BMI] 18.5–24.9 kg/m2, n = 3107) and prepregnancy obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2, n = 140) women. Pregnancy outcomes were compared according to the level of obesity (BMI 30–34.9 kg/m2, n = 94 and BMI ≥35 kg/m2, n = 46). Results: Obese women were significantly more likely to have gestational hypertension (OR = 8.59; 95% CI, 5.23–14.14; P < 0.0001), preeclampsia (OR = 2.06; 95% CI, 1.14–3.73; P < 0.0001), gestational diabetes (OR = 5.56; 95% CI, 3.66–8.49; P < 0.0001), dystocia (OR = 2.14; 95% CI, 1.36–3.38; P < 0.0001), induced labor (OR = 2.64; 95% CI, 1.83–3.80; P < 0.0001), failed induction of labor (OR = 18.06; 95% CI, 8.85–36.84; P < 0.0001), cesarean delivery (OR = 1.76; 95% CI, 1.25–2.49; P = 0.001), large-for-gestational-age newborns (OR = 3.68; 95% CI, 2.51–5.39; P < 0.0001). Significantly increased risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, dystocia and newborns with Apgar score ≤7 after 5 min was only observed in women with BMI ≥35 kg/m2. Conclusions: Maternal obesity is significantly associated with an increased risk of gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, dystocia, labor induction, failed induction of labor, large-for-gestational-age newborns and cesarean delivery.
Keywords: Obesity; Pregnancy; Large-for-gestational-age newborn; Gestational diabetes; Cesarean delivery Obesity; Pregnancy; Large-for-gestational-age newborn; Gestational diabetes; Cesarean delivery
MDPI and ACS Style

Ramonienė, G.; Maleckienė, L.; Nadišauskienė, R.J.; Bartusevičienė, E.; Railaitė, D.R.; Mačiulevičienė, R.; Maleckas, A. Maternal obesity and obstetric outcomes in a tertiary referral center. Medicina 2017, 53, 109-113.

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