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Medicina is published by MDPI from Volume 54 Issue 1 (2018). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Lithuanian Medical Association, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and Vilnius University.
Open AccessArticle

Impact of etiology on course and outcomes of severe acute pancreatitis

1
Department of Surgery, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
2
Laboratory of Surgical Gastroenterology, Institute for Digestive System Research, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
3
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2015, 51(3), 167-172; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medici.2015.04.002
Received: 23 April 2014 / Accepted: 24 April 2015 / Published: 2 July 2015
Background and objective: Since the influence of etiological factors on the course and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP) is not fully understood yet, the aim of the study was to compare the outcomes of alcoholic and biliary severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).
Materials and methods: We investigated 81 patients with alcoholic and biliary SAP. Demographic data, etiologic factors, severity scores, intra-abdominal pressure, imaging studies, interventions, and treatment outcomes were prospectively entered into specially maintained database and subsequently analyzed.
Results: No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of SAP in biliary and alcoholic AP groups (P = 0.429). Although, in the biliary SAP group patients were predominantly elderly women (P = 0.003), the total in-hospital stay was longer in alcoholic SAP patients (P = 0.021). The abdominal compartment syndrome developed more frequently (P = 0.041) and necrosectomy was more frequently performed in alcoholic SAP group (not statistically significant). Although not statistically significant, a lower mortality rate among biliary SAP patients (25.0% vs. 13.5%) was observed.
Conclusions: We defined a trend toward decreased incidence of infected necrosis in larger volume (≥30%) pancreatic necrosis, absence of abdominal compartment syndrome, lower rate of necrosectomies, shorter in-hospital stay, and an insignificantly reduced mortality rate in biliary SAP patients, indicating more favorable course of biliary SAP.
Keywords: Severe acute pancreatitis; Etiology; Outcome Severe acute pancreatitis; Etiology; Outcome
MDPI and ACS Style

Barauskas, G.; Ignatavičius, P.; Vitkauskienė, A.; Pundzius, J.; Dambrauskas, Ž. Impact of etiology on course and outcomes of severe acute pancreatitis. Medicina 2015, 51, 167-172.

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