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Medicina is published by MDPI from Volume 54 Issue 1 (2018). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Lithuanian Medical Association, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and Vilnius University.
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Symbiotic and antibiotic interactions between gut commensal microbiota and host immune system

1
St Catherine's College, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3UJ, UK
2
School of Life Sciences, Gibbet Hill Campus, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2015, 51(2), 69-75; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medici.2015.03.001
Published: 24 March 2015
The human gut commensal microbiota forms a complex population of microorganisms that survive by maintaining a symbiotic relationship with the host. Amongst the metabolic benefits it brings, formation of adaptive immune system and maintenance of its homeo- stasis are functions that play an important role. This review discusses the integral elements of commensal microbiota that stimulate responses of different parts of the immune system and lead to health or disease. It aims to establish conditions and factors that contribute to gut commensal microbiota's transformation from symbiotic to antibiotic relationship with human. We suggest that the host-microbiota relationship has been evolved to benefit both parties and any changes that may lead to disease, are not due to unfriendly properties of the gut microbiota but due to host genetics or environmental changes such as diet or infection.
Keywords: Immune system; Commensal microbiota; T-cells; B-cells; Dysbiosis Immune system; Commensal microbiota; T-cells; B-cells; Dysbiosis
MDPI and ACS Style

Kazimieras Malys, M.; Campbell, L.; Malys, N. Symbiotic and antibiotic interactions between gut commensal microbiota and host immune system. Medicina 2015, 51, 69-75.

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