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Medicina is published by MDPI from Volume 54 Issue 1 (2018). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Lithuanian Medical Association, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and Vilnius University.
Open AccessArticle

Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells: Implications for Cell-Mediated Therapies

1
Stem Cell Research Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
2
Institute of Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania
3
Department of Orthopedics and Surgery, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania
4
Department of Nephrology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania
5
Department of Endocrinology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2011, 47(9), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina47090068
Received: 17 August 2011 / Accepted: 30 September 2011 / Published: 5 October 2011
Current advances in stem cell research and innovative biological approaches in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine could eventually translate into prospective clinical applications. Various adult organs and tissues harbor stem and progenitor cells that could potentially be used to repair, regenerate, and restore a variety of different tissues following acute injury or tissue destructive diseases. Skeletal muscle is a very convenient and plentiful source of somatic stem cells. It contains several distinct populations of myogenic stem cells including satellite cells that are mainly responsible for muscle growth and regeneration, and multipotent muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs). Although both cell populations share some phenotypic similarities, MDSCs display a much greater differentiation potential in vitro and are capable of regenerating various tissues in vivo. Furthermore, these cells not only participate in the regeneration process by differentiating into tissue-specific cell types, but also promote endogenous tissue repair by secreting a multitude of trophic factors. In this article, we describe the biological aspects of MDSC isolation and characterization and provide an overview of potential therapeutic application of these cells for the treatment of cardiac and skeletal muscle injuries and diseases, urological dysfunction, and bone and cartilage defects. We also discuss major challenges and limitations currently faced by MDSC-based therapies that await resolution before these techniques can be applied clinically.
Keywords: skeletal muscle; stem cells; cell therapy; tissue engineering skeletal muscle; stem cells; cell therapy; tissue engineering
MDPI and ACS Style

Ūsas, A.; Mačiulaitis, J.; Mačiulaitis, R.; Jakubonienė, N.; Milašius, A.; Huard, J. Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells: Implications for Cell-Mediated Therapies. Medicina 2011, 47, 469.

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