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Medicina is published by MDPI from Volume 54 Issue 1 (2018). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Lithuanian Medical Association, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and Vilnius University.
Open AccessArticle

Risk Factors for Erosive Esophagitis and Barrett’s Esophagus in a high Helicobacter pylori Prevalence Area

1
Institute for Digestive Research, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences
2
Republican Panevėžys Hospital
3
Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2011, 47(8), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina47080065
Received: 27 June 2011 / Accepted: 31 August 2011 / Published: 5 September 2011
Objective. To establish the prevalence and risk factors of erosive esophagitis (EE) and Barrett’s esophagus (BE) among patients routinely referred for upper endoscopy. Material and Methods. A total of 4032 consecutive patients referred to a regional hospital for upper endoscopy due to upper gastrointestinal and/or “alarm” symptoms were examined. Analysis was performed on the prospectively selected patients (40 in each group) with EE of different grades and BE.
Results.
EE was diagnosed in 474 patients (11.75%): grade A, in 194 (41%); grade B, in 167 (35%); grade C, in 65 (14%); and grade D, in 48 patients (10%). Increasing severity of erosive esophagitis and presence of its complication – Barrett’s esophagus – were associated with the decreasing prevalence of H. pylori and increasing hiatal hernia size (P<0.05). Male gender (OR, 3.57; 95% CI, 1.12 to 10.62), hiatal hernia >2 cm (OR, 3.73; 95% CI, 1.60 to 8.68), and absence of H. pylori (OR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.07 to 16.84) were the factors found to be associated with severe EE. The factors associated with BE were as follows: ulcer and/or stricture of esophagus (OR, 11.94; 95% CI, 2.51 to 41.37), age >60 years (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20), smoking >10 cigarettes per day (OR, 4.62; 95% CI, 1.01 to 12.50), hiatal hernia >2 cm (OR, 5.22; 95% CI, 1.86 to 14.64), and absence of H. pylori (OR, 5.60; 95% CI, 1.38 to 22.72).
Conclusions.
The prevalence of EE was found to be low, and the prevalence of BE was found to be very low among routinely endoscoped patients in primary and secondary care settings in a Lithuanian rural area with high H. pylori prevalence. Increasing severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease was associated with the decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori.
Keywords: erosive esophagitis; Barrett’s esophagus; Helicobacter pylori; prevalence erosive esophagitis; Barrett’s esophagus; Helicobacter pylori; prevalence
MDPI and ACS Style

Jonaitis, L.; Kriukas, D.; Kiudelis, G.; Kupčinskas, L. Risk Factors for Erosive Esophagitis and Barrett’s Esophagus in a high Helicobacter pylori Prevalence Area. Medicina 2011, 47, 434.

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