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Medicina is published by MDPI from Volume 54 Issue 1 (2018). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Lithuanian Medical Association, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and Vilnius University.
Open AccessArticle

An Open-Label Multicenter Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy Study of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Prevention of Neutropenic Complications in Breast Cancer Patients

1
Institute of Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences
2
Department of Oncology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences
3
Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University
4
Hospital of Oncology, Branch of Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2011, 47(8), 428; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina47080064
Received: 8 November 2010 / Accepted: 31 August 2011 / Published: 5 September 2011
The primary objective of this open-label, two chemotherapy arm, phase 4 study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of newly developed recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF) used to prevent neutropenia-related complications in patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with docetaxel (75 mg/m2) and doxorubicin (50 mg/m2) or docetaxel (100 mg/m2) alone. Material and Methods. A total of 50 patients who were treated with a maximum of 6 cycles of either docetaxel-doxorubicin (36 patients) or docetaxel alone (14 patients) every 21 days were recruited from 3 centers in Lithuania. All the patients received study medication rG-CSF at a dosage of 5 μg/kg per day (Sicor Biotech UAB, Teva Group) from day 2 of each cycle and continued for minimum 5 days or until absolute neutrophil count reached ≥1.5×109/L. Results. A total of 611 adverse events were reported. Most of them were related to myelotoxic chemotherapy. Two patients withdrew due to adverse events (neuropathy and bone pain). One patient died possibly because of pulmonary thromboembolism. The most frequently reported adverse events related to study drug in the docetaxel-doxorubicin and docetaxel groups were leukocytosis (22% and 21%, respectively), bone pain (19% and 21%, respectively), and headache (8% and 14%, respectively). The incidence of grade 4 neutropenia in both the groups was 47% and 29%, respectively, in all cycles and 42% and 21%, respectively, in cycle 1. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 8% in cycle 1 and 14% across all cycles. The mean duration of febrile neutropenia was 2.1 days (SD, 1.9) in cycle 1 and 2.14 days (SD 2.0) across all cycles in both the treatment groups. Conclusion. This study provide data that the study drug rG-CSF has the expected safety and could be an efficacious medication to decrease the risk of febrile neutropenia and related complications of myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer.
Keywords: rG-CSF; open-label multicenter study; breast cancer; safety; neutropenic complications rG-CSF; open-label multicenter study; breast cancer; safety; neutropenic complications
MDPI and ACS Style

Sveikata, A.; Liutkauskienė, S.; Juozaitytė, E.; Characiejus, D.; Tamošaitytė, L.; Šeštakauskas, K. An Open-Label Multicenter Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy Study of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Prevention of Neutropenic Complications in Breast Cancer Patients. Medicina 2011, 47, 428.

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