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Medicina is published by MDPI from Volume 54 Issue 1 (2018). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Lithuanian Medical Association, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and Vilnius University.
Open AccessArticle

Importance of pain evaluation for more accurate diagnosis of painful diabetic polyneuropathy

1
Department of Neurology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences
2
Department of Endocrinology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2010, 46(11), 735; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina46110104
Received: 30 April 2009 / Accepted: 8 November 2010 / Published: 13 November 2010
Pain is a common problem in diabetic neuropathy, but relatively little has been published regarding the extent to which it needs to be addressed in clinical practice. Objective. To assess neuropathic pain profile and its association with quantitative sensory testing in painful diabetic polyneuropathy.
Material and methods
. Altogether, 61 consecutive diabetic inpatients with symmetric neuropathic complaints were enrolled. Clinical neurological examination and quantitative sensory testing (QST) were performed. Patients were interviewed using the Neuropathic Pain Scale (NPS) and filled in the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ).
Results
. Of all patients, 49 (80.3%) had clinical diabetic polyneuropathy. Only 17 of these patients complained of lower extremity pain on an initial interview, while 27 marked it in the MPQ. The intensity of deep and superficial pain did not differ, but patients rated deep pain as more unpleasant than superficial (6.27±2.37 vs. 4.30±1.42 on the NPS, P=0.034). Superficial pain NPS items tended to correlate with QST results, while deep pain items did not. Only female gender (OR=7.87) and lower glycosylated hemoglobin level (OR=0.65) were predictive of pain in case of diabetic neuropathy.
Conclusions
. Standard pain questionnaires were useful in identifying pain sufferers. At the same intensity, deep neuropathic pain was more unpleasant than superficial. Pain manifestation was associated with female gender and lower level of glycosylated hemoglobin.
Keywords: glycemic control (HbA1c); quantitative sensory testing; painful diabetic neuropathy; superficial pain; deep pain glycemic control (HbA1c); quantitative sensory testing; painful diabetic neuropathy; superficial pain; deep pain
MDPI and ACS Style

Petrikonis, K.; Ščiupokas, A.; Samušytė, G.; Janušauskaitė, J.; Šulcaitė, R.; Vaitkus, A. Importance of pain evaluation for more accurate diagnosis of painful diabetic polyneuropathy. Medicina 2010, 46, 735.

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