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Medicina is published by MDPI from Volume 54 Issue 1 (2018). Articles in this Issue were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. Articles are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Lithuanian Medical Association, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and Vilnius University.
Open AccessArticle

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia: Associations with a source of infection and antibiotic resistance

1
Laboratory of Microbiology, Clinic of Laboratory Medicine
2
Department of Intensive Care, Kaunas University of Medicine, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2009, 45(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina45010001
Received: 30 June 2008 / Accepted: 21 October 2008 / Published: 26 October 2008
Aim of the study. To determine the associations between the source of infection and antibiotic resistance in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia.
Material and methods
. A retrospective analysis of 50 patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia was carried out. If sepsis was suspected, blood culture was incubated in an automatic system BACTEC 9240. Then bacteria were identified, and their antibiotic resistance was estimated by disc diffusion method. If Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were resistant to three or more antibiotics, they were considered as multidrug-resistant.
Results. The origin of bacteremia was confirmed in 33 (66%) patients. Lower respiratory tract was the predominant source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia (81.8%, n=27) as compared with infection of wound (39.4%, n=13), urinary tract (15.2%, n=5), and drain or cerebrospinal fluid (9.1%, n=3) (P<0.05). Eighteen percent (n=9) of strains, which caused bacteremia, were resistant to ceftazidime; 38% (n=19), to piperacillin; 22% (n=11), to imipenem; 26% (n=13), to meropenem; 24% (n=12), to ciprofloxacin; 40% (n=20), to gentamicin; and only 8% (n=4), to amikacin. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were more frequently isolated if a source of infection was wound comparing to a source of other localization (61.5%, n=8 and 20.0%, n=4, respectively; P<0.05). Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to imipenem was associated with resistance to ciprofloxacin (13.2%, n=5 and 50.0%, n=6, retrospectively; P<0.05), but resistance to meropenem – both to ciprofloxacin and amikacin.
Conclusions. The predominant source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia was lower respiratory tract, and multidrug-resistant strains caused bacteremia more frequently if a source infection was wound. Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance to carbapenems was associated with resistance to ciprofloxacin and resistance to meropenem – also to amikacin. Resistance of strains to ceftazidime and piperacillin was associated with resistance to gentamicin.
Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa; bacteremia; source; antibiotic resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa; bacteremia; source; antibiotic resistance
MDPI and ACS Style

Dambrauskienė, A.; Adukauskienė, D.; Jeroch, J.; Vitkauskienė, A. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia: Associations with a source of infection and antibiotic resistance. Medicina 2009, 45, 1.

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