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Special Issue "Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability of Culture and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Máiréad Nic Craith

Department of Languages & Intercultural Studies, School of Social Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Intangible cultural heritage; world heritage sites; heritage and human rights; literary heritage; power and cultural policy
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ullrich Kockel

Department of Languages & Intercultural Studies, School of Social Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable local/regional development, especially the appraisal, planning and management of cultural resources, approached from an interdisciplinary perspective rooted in ethno-/anthropology, cultural ecology, political economy and philosophy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The European Union has designated 2018 as the first European Year of Cultural Heritage. This year will celebrate historic buildings in towns and cities, as well as the expressions of heritage in the landscape and in archaeological sites. It also highlights what one may call “living heritage”, including literature, art, crafts, traditional stories, food ways and social media.

Drawing on that broad definition of heritage, this Special Issue focuses on issues of conservation and sustainability for the heritage sector at large. Topics of relevance include the impact of climate change on historical buildings, human ecological dimensions of cultural heritage conservation, the challenges of cultural heritage tourism for sustainable economic development, or the impact of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage on tradition bearers and communities. The geographical scope of this special issue is global, encompassing urban and rural contexts, authorised, as well as subaltern approaches to tangible and intangible heritage; sustainability is considered in all relevant forms, including social, economic, cultural and political along with environmental.We welcome theoretical and methodological approaches, as well as case studies.

Prof. Dr. Máiréad Nic Craith
Prof. Dr. Ullrich Kockel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • World Heritage status and sustainable development
  • The UN Sustainable Development Goals and heritage
  • Sustainable cultural tourism
  • Conservation of intangible heritages
  • Traditional ecological knowledge
  • Heritage in vulnerable environments
  • Co-curation of cultural heritages
  • Cultural resource management

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effects of Urban Growth on Architectural Heritage: The Case of Buddhist Monasteries in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1593; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051593
Received: 9 April 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 May 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
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Abstract
Urbanization is unavoidable on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and it directly influences the region’s architectural heritage. This study aims to evaluate the changes in urbanization around 152 Buddhist monasteries (3 km × 3 km) from 1993 to 2013 located in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. To
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Urbanization is unavoidable on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and it directly influences the region’s architectural heritage. This study aims to evaluate the changes in urbanization around 152 Buddhist monasteries (3 km × 3 km) from 1993 to 2013 located in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. To evaluate the changes, we adopt both nighttime light data and data from the Geographic Information System, which were verified by the spatial relationship between urban areas of Lhasa and monasteries on a meso-scale and the environmental changes around monasteries by visual interpretation on a micro-scale in the same phase. The results show that the level of urbanization around 43 monasteries has increased between 1993 and 2013, and the areas of significant influence from urban growth have expanded from Lhasa between 1993 and 2003 to the Yarlung Tsangpo River, Nyangqu, and Lhasa River regions, as well as to the surrounding areas of Xining, and Tibetan areas in Sichuan between 2003 and 2013. This study explores a method of monitoring the architectural heritage of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau using “remote sensing big data”, which can provide data support for policy formulation, technical intervention, and targeted field investigation on architectural heritage by screening research objects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability Based on Surveying and Modeling: The Case of the 14th Century Building Corral del Carbón (Granada, Spain)
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1370; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051370
Received: 9 April 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 24 April 2018 / Published: 27 April 2018
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Abstract
Cultural Heritage buildings face major challenges trying to combine a usability function with conservation and restoration obligations. Suitable conservation involves a complex set of activities, some concerned with historical documentation (functionality, construction materials, physical developments, etc.). Other activities require a geometrical description in
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Cultural Heritage buildings face major challenges trying to combine a usability function with conservation and restoration obligations. Suitable conservation involves a complex set of activities, some concerned with historical documentation (functionality, construction materials, physical developments, etc.). Other activities require a geometrical description in order to detect pathologies related to walls tilting, displacements or roofs and beams deformation. Here, we propose a methodology that takes into account all those requirements when modeling a key 14th century Cultural Heritage building in Granada (Spain): Corral del Carbón. Known in the Moorish period as “Alhóndiga”, the building was used as an inn and a warehouse for merchandise. We survey the building with the most accurate techniques currently available (scanner laser and photogrammetry). After surveying it, we model the building at different levels of detail taking into account the various phases known to comprise the building. Finally, we propose an HBIM (Heritage Building Information Modeling) for building maintenance and facilitate its sustainability and usability over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Preservation of Cultural Heritage Embodied in Traditional Crafts in the Developing Countries. A Case Study of Pakistani Handicraft Industry
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1336; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051336
Received: 29 January 2018 / Revised: 19 April 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 25 April 2018
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Abstract
Cultural heritage embodied in traditional crafts is an integral part of any nation which reflects the culture and tradition of a particular region. Although the importance of handicraft has been widely recognized, the literature regarding preservation of traditional craft is scarce. The present
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Cultural heritage embodied in traditional crafts is an integral part of any nation which reflects the culture and tradition of a particular region. Although the importance of handicraft has been widely recognized, the literature regarding preservation of traditional craft is scarce. The present paper aimed to explore and identify issues faced by traditional craftsmanship in developing countries and to address those issues in order to contribute to the sustainability of traditional craft heritage and ensure continuous transmission of craft skills and knowledge from generation to generation. Our study identified several key issues which poses substantial challenges to the preservation of traditional craft heritage in developing countries. In order to add empirical evidence, we examined the case of Pakistani handicraft industry that provided further understanding of highlighted issues which traditional craft heritage face. We have suggested some policies to promote, develop and preserve the traditional craft heritage. The significance of these policy suggestions is underlined with the case study of Pakistan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Assessing the Needs and Gaps of Building Information Technologies for Energy Retrofit of Historic Buildings in the Korean Context
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1319; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051319
Received: 27 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 19 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
Most domestic modern buildings from the early 1900s have been constructed as heavy mass, and for many years have relied on passive measures for climate control. Since effective passive measures eventually reduce the heating and cooling loads, thus also reducing the system size,
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Most domestic modern buildings from the early 1900s have been constructed as heavy mass, and for many years have relied on passive measures for climate control. Since effective passive measures eventually reduce the heating and cooling loads, thus also reducing the system size, passive and hybrid measures are the most preferred Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs). In addition, the domestic situation and climate are additional constraints in energy retrofit decision making, such as a shorter budget and time, poor maintenance history, and uncertainties in vernacular lifestyle. For this reason, the performance improvement and side-effects prior to installing ECMs should be predictable, particularly in case the originality can be damaged. This complexity confirms that simulation-based Measurement and Verification (M&V) would better suit the energy retrofit of domestic historic buildings. However, many domestic investors still believe re-construction has a larger economic value than restoration. Therefore, they are even unwilling to invest in more time than a preset audit period—typically less than a week. Although simulation-based M&V is theoretically favored for retrofit decision making, its process including collecting data, modeling and analysis, and evaluating and designing ECMs could still be too demanding to domestic practitioners. While some manual, repetitive, error-prone works exist in the conventional retrofit process and simulation-based M&V, it is proposed here that enhanced Building Information Technology (BIT) is able to simplify, automate, and objectify, at least the critical steps of the retrofit project. The aim of this study is to find an efficient and effective energy retrofit strategy for domestic historic buildings that appeals to both domestic investors and practitioners by testing selective BIT tools on an actual historic building. This study concludes with the suggestion that software vendors are asked to develop enhanced features to resolve users’ pending demands. It is also suggested that, in the domestic context, how the current practice for each process of the energy retrofit of historic buildings needs to shift to take a full advantage of BIT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Value Direction: Moving Crafts toward Sustainability in the Yangtze River Delta, China
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041252
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 14 April 2018 / Accepted: 16 April 2018 / Published: 19 April 2018
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Abstract
The paper presents ongoing research on craft and design for sustainability in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China. Based on previous research into the relationship between craft and design for sustainability, and literature on value, a typology of five values pertaining to craft
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The paper presents ongoing research on craft and design for sustainability in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China. Based on previous research into the relationship between craft and design for sustainability, and literature on value, a typology of five values pertaining to craft is defined. This research investigates values and craft practices in the YRD through identifying the direction of craftwork development in the region and evaluating them against the defined five values. It is found that some crafts in the YRD are commercialized and strongly influenced by cosmopolitanism and consumerism, while some crafts with high intrinsic values are still in decline and need specific interventions. However, these interventions need more context-based consideration and evaluation. What might be regarded as “excessive” intervention in commercial promotion and mass-production could potentially homogenize local crafts, thereby undermining their distinctiveness and their intrinsic values. The aim of this paper is to (a) identify the direction of different craftworks categories in the YRD; and (b) evaluate them with the defined five values in order to inform future design intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Protocol to Manage Heritage-Building Interventions Using Heritage Building Information Modelling (HBIM)
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 908; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040908
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 14 March 2018 / Accepted: 15 March 2018 / Published: 21 March 2018
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Abstract
The workflow in historic architecture projects presents problems related to the lack of clarity of processes, dispersion of information and the use of outdated tools. Different heritage organisations have showed interest in innovative methods to resolve those problems and improve cultural tourism for
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The workflow in historic architecture projects presents problems related to the lack of clarity of processes, dispersion of information and the use of outdated tools. Different heritage organisations have showed interest in innovative methods to resolve those problems and improve cultural tourism for sustainable economic development. Building Information Modelling (BIM) has emerged as a suitable computerised system for improving heritage management. Its application to historic buildings is named Historic BIM (HBIM). HBIM literature highlights the need for further research in terms of the overall processes of heritage projects, its practical implementation and a need for better cultural documentation. This work uses Design Science Research to develop a protocol to improve the workflow in heritage interdisciplinary projects. Research techniques used include documentary analysis, semi-structured interviews and focus groups. HBIM is proposed as a virtual model that will hold heritage data and will articulate processes. As a result, a simple and visual HBIM protocol was developed and applied in a real case study. The protocol was named BIMlegacy and it is divided into eight phases: building registration, determine intervention options, develop design for intervention, planning the physical intervention, physical intervention, handover, maintenance and culture dissemination. It contemplates all the stakeholders involved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Impacts of Common Urban Development Factors on Cultural Conservation in World Heritage Cities: An Indicators-Based Analysis
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 853; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030853
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 8 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 17 March 2018
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Abstract
Within the urban context, heritage conservation has been acknowledged as fundamental for sustainable development. This paper address the need to develop methodologies that enable understanding of the dynamics between these two fields that for long were regarded as opposing practices. The research crosses
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Within the urban context, heritage conservation has been acknowledged as fundamental for sustainable development. This paper address the need to develop methodologies that enable understanding of the dynamics between these two fields that for long were regarded as opposing practices. The research crosses disciplinary boundaries through a mixed methodology that identifies 27 urban development common indicators as factors that are affecting the conservation of 69 World Heritage Cities (WHC). Indicators, which were selected from global urban monitoring tools, were analyzed within UNESCO State-of-Conservation reporting system. Results reveal key trends on urban factors assessed as a SWOT analysis in relation to the management of WHC. We argue that urban indicators can facilitate the understanding of development impacts in cultural heritage conservation, across the social, economic, and environmental dimensions. This paper contributes to the debate on the ability of indicators to bridge interdisciplinary and methodological issues that were related to common conceptualizations between urban development and heritage conservation and sustainability. The conceptual approach that is presented has proven to offer an empirical basis for a monitoring practice that fosters the sustainable management of urban heritage, which in the light of the New Development Agenda and the gaps in the state-of-the-art, is very much needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Marketing Research for Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability: Lessons from the Field
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030774
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 24 February 2018 / Accepted: 8 March 2018 / Published: 12 March 2018
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Abstract
This paper investigates the contribution of marketing research to cultural heritage conservation and sustainability, based on the assumption that the comprehension of the meaning of cultural heritage by new and extended audiences is a prerequisite for the future survival of tangible and intangible
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This paper investigates the contribution of marketing research to cultural heritage conservation and sustainability, based on the assumption that the comprehension of the meaning of cultural heritage by new and extended audiences is a prerequisite for the future survival of tangible and intangible heritage. After discussing steps and achievements in the scientific debate on museum marketing, current gaps and possible further developments are considered. Since the early 1980s, marketing research has investigated visitors’ profiles, motivations, and behaviors, and has progressively focused on improving the experience of cultural heritage, especially through the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in museums and heritage sites. A literature review suggests that scant attention has been paid to qualitative research that is aimed at investigating the knowledge and skills of visitors and non-visitors and their understanding of the value of cultural heritage. Moving from these results, and taking into account recent data about the attitudes and opinions of people in Europe on cultural heritage, the field research focuses on the perception and communication of local cultural heritage among young generations. The results of six focus groups conducted in 2016 with undergraduate and postgraduate students (University of Macerata, Italy) are analyzed. The research findings reveal a number of difficulties and limitations with regard to communicating and understanding the value of heritage. In order to better investigate these gaps, the outcomes of this preliminary study could be tested and put to cross-analysis using different methods. However, they do provide useful evidence for understanding the link between audience development and cultural heritage sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Strategies and Actions to Recover the Landscape after Flooding: The Case of Vernazza in the Cinque Terre National Park (Italy)
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 742; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030742
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 4 March 2018 / Accepted: 6 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
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Abstract
European territories are fragile places in which landslides and flooding have occurred with a high frequency in recent decades, risking the safety of settlements and people and the integrity of the landscape. In many cases, recourse has been made to geotechnical and hydraulic
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European territories are fragile places in which landslides and flooding have occurred with a high frequency in recent decades, risking the safety of settlements and people and the integrity of the landscape. In many cases, recourse has been made to geotechnical and hydraulic interventions that have been rather non-uniform and partial and which, in prestigious areas, have made intervention after the fact problematic in recovering/mitigating what was done with extreme urgency. This paper reports on theoretical/applied research that implements methodological, multi-system experimentation and interdisciplinary skills for a project to recover the landscape within the Cinque Terre National Park (World Heritage Site, Italy). This recovery is capable of responding to the demand for protection, conservation, transformation and management of this cultural landscape par excellence. The methodological approach, the results of the research and the planning solutions span two scales—territorial and local—thereby highlighting the need for an approach to both micro- and macro-scale knowledge of the cultural landscape system to understand its structure and elements and to intervene with the proper planning sensitivity. Guidelines, masterplans and profiles of the types of intervention constitute the large- and small-scale results of the research, translating the strategies of the guidelines into planning actions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Reconstructing Tradition: Heritage Authentication and Tourism-Related Commodification of the Ancient City of Pingyao
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 670; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030670
Received: 13 January 2018 / Revised: 24 February 2018 / Accepted: 27 February 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
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Abstract
This paper examines how the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage (CCPWCNH) is implemented in China, with specific reference to tourism development at the local level in the Ancient City of
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This paper examines how the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage (CCPWCNH) is implemented in China, with specific reference to tourism development at the local level in the Ancient City of Pingyao (ACP). Based on a qualitative methodology and constructivist paradigm, the research employs observation and semi-structured interviews to explore how the interaction between heritage authorization and tourism-related commodification shapes the transformation of the local community. Giddens’ theories, amongst others, on modernity, time–space distanciation, disembedding, and reflexivity, are employed to analyze this case study. The paper argues that the reconstruction of “traditional-style culture” has contributed to the transformative processes in the ACP. Traditional-style culture differs from “traditional culture” in that the former refers to cultural forms that are purposely (re)constructed to serve contemporary political or economic needs, while the latter refers to cultural forms that are rooted in the local contexts of premodern societies. One of the impacts of traditional-style culture, which is the product of the interaction between heritage authorization and tourism development, is the emergence of a commercialized environment. This environment confounds the notion of authenticity that is claimed in authorized concepts of heritage. There, construction of traditional-style culture demonstrates the relationship of powerful actors with hierarchical power, leading to an unequal positioning of external agents (such as heritage experts) and local residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle The WHS Designation—A Factor of Sustainable Tourism Growth for Romanian Rural Areas?
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 626; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030626
Received: 1 February 2018 / Revised: 19 February 2018 / Accepted: 21 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
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Abstract
The presence of World Heritage Sites has been frequently used as a mean of tourism promotion and increased attractiveness. However, previous studies showed contradictory results regarding the territorial impact of World Heritage Sites, and very few researchers discussed their impact in Eastern Europe.
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The presence of World Heritage Sites has been frequently used as a mean of tourism promotion and increased attractiveness. However, previous studies showed contradictory results regarding the territorial impact of World Heritage Sites, and very few researchers discussed their impact in Eastern Europe. This paper examines how the presence of World Heritage Sites in rural localities influenced the tourism growth and sustainable development in Romania after 2000. Independent Sample t-test was used to analyse the evolution of tourism and sustainable development indicators between 2001 and 2016. The results suggest an absence of a positive effect induced by World Heritage Sites in rural areas. It seems that, by itself, the brand has not enough power to sustain tourist attractiveness if it is not endorsed by national, regional, and local initiatives. These findings lead a discussion about how certain sites managed to induce a sustained tourism growth while others failed to do so. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Using Toponyms to Analyze the Endangered Manchu Language in Northeast China
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 563; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020563
Received: 12 January 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 16 February 2018 / Published: 24 February 2018
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Abstract
UNESCO has classified Manchu in Northeast China as a critically endangered language. Toponyms can act as carriers of languages and can be preserved for a long time. The Manchu language was the national language in the Qing Dynasty, and there are many Manchu
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UNESCO has classified Manchu in Northeast China as a critically endangered language. Toponyms can act as carriers of languages and can be preserved for a long time. The Manchu language was the national language in the Qing Dynasty, and there are many Manchu place names in Northeast China that serve as “living heritages” that retain traces of ancient local cultures. We studied Manchu and other related ethnic place names in Northeast China by integrating spatial statistical measures using geographic information systems (GIS) to analyze the endangered languages in the region. The objective was to explore not only the distribution of ethnic toponyms within a relevant historical context but also the environmental factors associated with the endangered Manchu languages. This study reveals that the distributions of ethnic groups and languages can be revealed by the Sinification of ethnic toponyms in Northeast China. The evolution of spatial patterns of toponyms shows the interactive process between Manchus and Han Chinese. The Manchu language is endangered by the influences of Han Chinese migrants on the original culture, as reflected by crops and the distances to the nearest roads, which are indicators of farming culture and accessibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessCommunication A Valuation of the Restoration of Hwangnyongsa Temple in South Korea
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 369; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020369
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 25 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 31 January 2018
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Abstract
Hwangnyongsa Temple (HT) in South Korea belongs to the Gyeongju Historic Areas, designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2000. The temple was destroyed by fire in AD 1238 and today there are few traces left, however the government is seeking to
[...] Read more.
Hwangnyongsa Temple (HT) in South Korea belongs to the Gyeongju Historic Areas, designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2000. The temple was destroyed by fire in AD 1238 and today there are few traces left, however the government is seeking to restore HT. This paper aims to evaluate the economic benefits of the restoration using contingent valuation (CV), and to then perform a cost-benefit analysis of the restoration. For this purpose, people’s willingness to pay (WTP) for the restoration is elicited from a survey of 1000 households. The average household’s WTP is estimated as KRW 2341 (USD 2.07) per annum. The current values of the benefits and costs of the restoration computed for the relevant period and population are KRW 415.3 billion (USD 366.9 million) and KRW 232.2 billion (USD 205.1 million), respectively. As the former is more than the latter, the restoration is socially profitable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Urban Regeneration and the Search for Identity in Historic Cities
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010048
Received: 3 September 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 14 December 2017 / Published: 26 December 2017
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Abstract
In the face of rapid economic development, population growth, people increasing needs and changing lifestyles, most historic centers in the Gulf have experienced problems in making the necessary adjustment and adaptation to the present needs and changes. This paper examines the role of
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In the face of rapid economic development, population growth, people increasing needs and changing lifestyles, most historic centers in the Gulf have experienced problems in making the necessary adjustment and adaptation to the present needs and changes. This paper examines the role of urban regeneration in revitalizing redundant historic areas and how they can be used to reinforce their cities urban identities. This study is based on the case study approach by focusing on the urban regeneration of Msheireb in old Doha, Qatar. Since the project is not yet completed, this paper will focus on the physical aspects of urban identity rather than its social dimensions. The empirical investigation used a comprehensive fieldwork undertaken through several site visits. This paper argues that one way of rediscovering the urban identity of the city of Doha is to go back to its first roots and try to sustain them in face of the emerging global environments. Through the Msheireb urban regeneration project, this paper explores a new experience in Qatar and the Gulf in creating a new urban identity inspired from the past. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle Securing the Future of Cultural Heritage by Identifying Barriers to and Strategizing Solutions for Preservation under Changing Climate Conditions
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2143; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9112143
Received: 30 October 2017 / Revised: 15 November 2017 / Accepted: 19 November 2017 / Published: 21 November 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (729 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Climate change challenges cultural heritage management and preservation. Understanding the barriers that can impede preservation is of paramount importance, as is developing solutions that facilitate the planning and management of vulnerable cultural resources. Using online survey research, we elicited the opinions of diverse
[...] Read more.
Climate change challenges cultural heritage management and preservation. Understanding the barriers that can impede preservation is of paramount importance, as is developing solutions that facilitate the planning and management of vulnerable cultural resources. Using online survey research, we elicited the opinions of diverse experts across southeastern United States, a region with cultural resources that are particularly vulnerable to flooding and erosion from storms and sea level rise. We asked experts to identify the greatest challenges facing cultural heritage policy and practice from coastal climate change threats, and to identify strategies and information needs to overcome those challenges. Using content analysis, we identified institutional, technical and financial barriers and needs. Findings revealed that the most salient barriers included the lack of processes and preservation guidelines for planning and implementing climate adaptation actions, as well as inadequate funding and limited knowledge about the intersection of climate change and cultural heritage. Experts perceived that principal needs to overcome identified barriers included increased research on climate adaptation strategies and impacts to cultural heritage characteristics from adaptation, as well as collaboration among diverse multi-level actors. This study can be used to set cultural heritage policy and research agendas at local, state, regional and national scales. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainability)
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