Special Issue "Influenza Vaccines"

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A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2014

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Sarah Gilbert
The Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK
Website: http://www.jenner.ac.uk/prof-sarah-gilbert
E-Mail: sarah.gilbert@ndm.ox.ac.uk
Phone: +44 01865 617605
Interests: T cell vaccines; DNA, MVA and fowlpox vaccines; tuberculosis and influenza vaccines

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last decade has seen much innovation in the field of influenza vaccines research, but, despite the continued threat of a pandemic caused by a new avian influenza virus and the reality of a pandemic caused by a swine influenza virus in 2009, the majority of influenza vaccines used today are still made in the same way as they were in the 1940s, still require annual revaccination and achieve disappointing efficacy in the main target population, older adults. However, the situation is already changing, with live attenuated vaccines now licensed for use in children in Europe, more manufacturers moving to cell-based, rather than egg-based, production for inactivated vaccines, adjuvanted vaccines now available and a recombinant haemagglutinin vaccine licensed in the U.S.

Vaccines designed to improve efficacy in older adults (adjuvanted or high-dose) have been tested. Research is being conducted into many alternative approaches to influenza vaccine development, covering the boosting of T cell responses to conserved antigens, the use of influenza antigens, other than haemagglutinin, to stimulate antibody responses and the production of virus-like particles in various expression systems. Within the next decade we may expect to see the licensing of new influenza vaccines that are more protective in all age groups, can protect against drifted variants of the circulating subtypes, or no longer require annual revaccination. We will be better able to respond to a new influenza pandemic. Improved vaccines for pigs and domestic poultry will enable us to reduce the exposure of humans to potentially pandemic viruses.

This special issue of Vaccines will cover all aspects of this broad area of research.

Prof. Dr. Sarah Gilbert
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • influenza
  • vaccines
  • efficacy
  • pandemic
  • seasonal
  • cellular immunity
  • antibodies

Published Papers

No papers have been published in this special issue yet.

Last update: 8 April 2014

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